THE CLIP-ON METHOD is a two–volume book that brings together writing by Noland, sociological essays selected by the artist, and a considerable amount of exhibition photography from the 1980s to the present.

The exhibition The American Trip, curated by Philip Monk, featured the work of Larry Clark, Nan Goldin, Cady Noland and Richard Prince. Monk’s essay focuses on the fascination in American culture with the outlaw, outcasts and margins of society. The title refers to a constant theme in American cultural dynamics of the rejection of family and reformation of community, which is now expressed in the subcultures of the margins. What starts as a celebration by artists, is appropriated by the mainstream media and ends as a panic in the press. Nowhere is the fear greater than in the heart of the American family that the enemy is within and that the kids are not “alright.” The images of individuals in the exhibition show them not to be traditional outlaws. They are, as the artists celebrate, the girl-or boy-next door.

Formed by Harvey S. Shipley Miller and donated to The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in 2005, The Judith Rothschild Foundation Contemporary Drawings Collection was conceived to be the widest possible cross-section of contemporary drawing made primarily within the past 20 years, surveying gestural and geometric abstraction, representation and figuration, systems-based and conceptual work, as well as appropriation and collage. While the collection primarily focuses on the work of artists living and working in what are widely regarded as five major centers of visual art today–New York, Los Angeles, London/Glasgow, Berlin and Cologne/Dusseldorf–it also includes artists from 30 countries throughout Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa. Established artists such as Jasper Johns are represented through examples of recent work, while others, such as Joseph Beuys and Philip Guston, are highlighted through core historic groupings, and still others are shown in a comprehensive overview of their careers, including Alighiero e Boetti, Lee Bontecou, Ray Johnson, Anish Kapoor, Franz West, Bruce Conner and Hannah Wilke. Minimal and Conceptual drawings from the 1960s and 1970s acquired by the Foundation from New York-based collectors Eileen and Michael Cohen are juxtaposed with major works by self-taught artists including James Castle, Henry Darger, Ele D’Artagnan and Pearl Blauvelt, representing a diverse anthology of works on paper. Additional highlights, both contemporary and historic, include works by Tomma Abts, Kai Althoff, Robert Crumb, Tacita Dean, Peter Doig, Angus Fairhurst, Mark Grotjahn, Richard Hamilton, Eva Hesse, Charline von Heyl, Christian Holstad, Roni Horn, Ellsworth Kelly, Martin Kippenberger, Roy Lichtenstein, Sherrie Levine, Lee Lozano, Agnes Martin, Cady Noland, Jennifer Pastor, Elizabeth Peyton, Adrian Piper, Paul Thek, Richard Wright and Andrea Zittel.
D.A.P. is pleased to offer two extraordinary volumes dedicated to this extraordinary collection–published to accompany a major exhibition–as well as this boxed set that includes both. Reminiscent of the classic 2002 MoMA catalogue Drawing Now the first of these volumes, Compass in Hand, brings together approximately 250 representative works. The second, The Judith Rothschild Collection of Contemporary Drawings, is a complete catalogue raisonne.

Just Love Me–with its title taken directly from a late 90s neon sign by Tracey Emin–reveals how complex and differentiated female identity constructions have become today. Classically assigned roles have broken down. Radical feminist positions of the 70s and 80s no longer make sense. But if much has changed since the late 60s, when feminist artists began to make their most prominent moves, many social and structural problems remain. The strategies and perspectives of women artists today–and, presumably, of women today–are here considered through a selection of works by an important group of contemporary (mostly) women artists: Matthew Barney, Rineke Dijkstra, Tracey Emin, Mona Hatoum, Jonathan Horowitz, Sarah Jones, Mike Kelley, Karen Kilimnik, Sarah Lucas, Tracey Moffat, Cady Noland, Catherine Opie, Pipilotti Rist, Daniela Rossell, Cindy Sherman, Ann-Sofi Sidan, Sam Taylor-Wood, Gillian Wearing, Sue Williams, and Andrea Zittel.

With its title taken from a signature work by Bruce Nauman, Life, Death, Love, Hate ,Pleasure, Pain presents a selection of approximately 190 works from the collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. A wide-ranging, insightful survey, arranged in roughly chronological order, it features work by such artists as Vito Acconci, Magdalena Abakanowicz, Francis Bacon, Matthew Barney, Joseph, Beuys, Christo, Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle, KerryJames Marshall, Mariko Mori, Martin Puryear, Richard Serra, Yinka Shonibare, and H. C. Westermann. In an introductory essay, chief curator Elizabeth Smith discusses key trends in art from World War II to the present and provides a brief history of the MCA and its collection. Additional, accessible short texts by the curatorial staff of the MCA focus on individual works. Artists Include: Ann Hamilton, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Jenny Holzer, Max Ernst, Cady Noland, Jeanne Dunning, Jean Dubuffet, Chuck Close, Christo , Alexander Calder, Joseph Beuys, Bernd & Hilla Becher, Matthew Barney, Francis Bacon, Dan Flavin, Adrian Piper and Vito Acconci, amongst many others. Essays by Lynne Warren, Elizabeth A. T. Smith, Alison Pearlman, Julie Rodrigues, Francesco Bonami, Staci Boris, Sylvia Chivaratanond, Monika Gehlawat, Lela Hersh, Dominic Molon, Heather Ring, Michael Rooks, Jenni Sorkin, and Tricia Van Eck. Foreword by Robert Fitzpatrick.

A photographic journey across London, taking in a selection of contemporary art and a curry along the way. Based in London, nvisible Museum is the product of twelve years’ worth of acquisitions by a collector who prefers to remain anonymous. Works are often seminal pieces by young artists early in their careers. Uniquely, the contents of collection are dispersed and nomadic, lent to friends and artists in the collection, and from time to time loaned to art institutions in thematic exhibitions, including the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco; Migros Museum, Zurich; Kiasma Museo, Helsinki; and Sir John Soane’s Museum, London in 2002. <I>Invisible London</I> is a photographic journey from Heathrow to Brick Lane, taking in some of the city’s public places and moving inside the flats, houses and studios where the collection of nvisible Museum is locatedin subtle and compelling opposition to the gigantism and monumentalism of contemporary art collecting. Combines art and voyeurism with glimpses of an extraordinary art collection. 90 color photographs. Artists represented: Nobuyoshi Araki; Matthew Barney; Richard Billingham; Kate Blacker; Louise Bourgeois; Jake and Dinos Chapman; Tacita Dean; Tracey Emin; Katharina Fritsch; Paul Graham; Douglas Gordon; Richard Hamilton; Tim Head; Damien Hirst; Gary Hume; Callum Innes; Emma Kay; Simon Linke; Adam Lowe; Steve McQueen; Paul Miller aka DJ Spooky; Tatsuo Miyajima; Paul Morrison; Cady Noland; Gabriel Orozco; Simon Patterson; Mark Pimlott; Marc Quinn; Liisa Roberts; Tim Rollins + K.O.S.; Gregor Schneider; Simon Starling; Georgina Starr; Thomas Struth; Sam Taylor-Wood; Mark Wallinger; Rachel Whiteread; Gerard Williams; Yves Klein.

In 2009, the revered Swiss art publication and editions publisher, Parkett, celebrates its quarter-centenary with a comprehensive retrospective collecting all 200 of the artists editions it has produced since 1984. (They include Tomma Abts, Maurizio Cattelan, John Currin, Peter Fischli/David Weiss, Nan Goldin, Dan Graham, Wade Guyton, Zoe Leonard, Paul McCarthy, Marilyn Minter, Cady Noland, Raymond Pettibon, Richard Prince, Charles Ray, Gerhard Richter, Pipilotti Rist, Ed Ruscha, Dana Schutz, Hiroshi Sugimoto and Christopher Wool, to name just a few.) Originating at the celebrated SANAA-designed 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan, the exhibition builds on previous retrospectives held at Kunsthaus Zurich (2005), the Irish Museum of Modern Art (2002), The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2001), and Whitechapel Art Gallery, London (2001). “Commissioned by Parkett, the most important artists of our time have created editions that represent the essence of their art or reveal an unexpected dimension… the works cover every possible medium including painting, photographs, drawings, prints, sculptures, videos, DVDs, and sound pieces,” wrote Whitechapel’s Iwona Blazwick in 2001. Weighing in at more than 450 pages, this super-collectible catalogue raisonne, produced in conjunction with the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, is the most comprehensive catalogue ever produced on Parkett’s fabled editions. As such, it is a unique document of today’s art.

Greek collector Dakis Joannou is one of the preeminent collectors of contemporary art in the world, with a collection that stands as a virtual who’s who of artists from the 1980s through today. 85 of those artists are represented in Monument to Now–the most utterly relevant to today, of course. Leading curators from New York, Milan and Paris have contributed essays and selected the included artists. Designed by acclaimed graphic artist Stefan Sagmeister, the hardcover edition features a three-dimensional monument affixed to the front cover; the paperback retains some trace of the monument, perhaps a footprint of the monument on the front cover, a pop-up monument inside, or some other invention. The follow-up to Everything That’s Interesting Is New, an earlier book on the Joannou collection, Monument to Now strictly includes work dating from 1985 and later, with a focus on the artists who are most relevant now. Among many new acquisitions featured are works by Vanessa Beecroft, Maurizio Cattelan, Gregory Crewdson, Anna Gaskell, Mariko Mori, Chris Ofili, Tom Sachs, Fred Tomaselli and Kara Walker. Other included artists are Janine Antoni, Matthew Barney, Ashley Bickerton, Rineke Dijkstra, Olafur Eliasson, Robert Gober, Andreas Gursky, Peter Halley, Mike Kelley, Toba Khedoori, Jeff Koons, Paul McCarthy, Takashi Murakami, Shirin Neshat, Tim Noble & Sue Webster, Cady Noland, Gabriel Orozco, Charles Ray, Cindy Sherman, Kiki Smith, Wolfgang Tillmans, Gillian Wearing, Christopher Wool and Chen Zhen.

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