Unlike many contemporary artists whose work is based on theories of popular culture, Pierre et Gilles’ artistic achievement is deliberately fused with popular culture in the present tense. Beginning with their early celebrity portraits of the late 1970s (Iggy Pop, Yves Saint-Laurent), Pierre et Gilles have created a visual world in which artifice and reality are inseparable. Employing props, make-up, costumes, and lighting that emphasize the staged quality of their photographic sets, Pierre et Gilles pursue an ideal beauty in their extravagant, hand-painted photographs that systematically demolishes any distinction between kitsch and expressions of the sublime. Both the artists and their subjects seem to insist on the complete believability of their allegorical characters, at the same time as they revel in the evidence that everything in their photographs is an illusion. Pierre et Gilles’ roots in commercial illustration for magazine and record album covers have resulted in an extraordinarily powerful combination of celebrity culture and archetypal Christian and mythological iconography. The very perfection of the beautiful boys and glamorous, weeping women who populate their artifical paradise hints at the tragedy of doomed youth and fleeting innocence that becomes increasingly explicit in their later, darker work. Eros and Thanatos are Pierre et Gilles’ abiding themes, present from the start in their images of martyred saints, and coming increasingly to the fore in the sinister shadows and almost occult iconography of their latest pieces. This exquisitely produced book provides a new and insightful assessment of this unique, idyllic marriage of photography and painting by a leading contemporary art critic, examining the emergence of a gay aesthetic and a utopian popular culture in the first substantial overview of Pierre et Gilles’ career to include their latest, hitherto unpublished work.

An unbridled celebration of a life beyond guilt and expiation
As sweet as raspberry ripple, as tempting as popcorn. Welcome to the seductive pictures of Pierre et Gilles. Again and again they show people in kitschy scenarios against a background of flowers and hearts. When they are not snapping portraits of the well-known – most of whom are close friends like Marc Almond or Nina Hagen – and not-so-known, they photograph themselves.

Bizarre, and full of obscure significance, the photographs are reminiscent of stills from film melodramas.They are always colourful and presented with beguiling polish. They plunder the repertoire of historical presentation as though they were leafing through a collection of fabrics, and assume identities as though they were part of a mail-order catalogue.

Now the latest and most comprehensive collection of the works of these two photographers can be presented to the public – in a format designed by the artists themselves. In matt skin-colour, with a golden edging, the embossed cover is reminiscent of a quilted counterpane and promises a cuddly experience within. Once between the covers one can frolic at will in a soft, artificial world of pictures. This saccharine collection of kitsch encompasses all aspects of homosexuality and offers them in an appetising form even to those who abhor them. A straight challenge is issued to all readers to participate – at least with their eyes – in this unbridled celebration of a life beyond guilt and expiation. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

« Nul plus haut enseignement artistique ne me paraît pouvoir être reçu que du cristal. » André Breton De la Préhistoire à nos jours, entre utilité, curiosité et fascination, les pierres ont toujours inspiré les artistes. Pierres politiques, pierres poétiques, pierres sacrées : le lecteur découvre, à travers plus de 230 oeuvres, la place de la pierre dans l’histoire de l’art. « Je parle des pierres plus âgées que la vie et qui demeurent après elle sur les planètes refroidies. » Sur ces mots de Roger Caillois, dont le regard irrigue cet ouvrage, les auteurs ont collecté nombre d’histoires célébrant le compagnonnage constant entre l’éloquence muette des pierres, leur beauté et l’imagination sublime des artistes de toutes les époques. Du plus ancien caillou issu de la formation de la croûte terrestre à la première pierre collectionnée il y a 3 millions d’années par « l’homme » de Makapansgat ; de l’impérieuse architecture des cristaux aux pierres sacrées ; des pierres paysages à celles dont s’arment les plus démunis quand ils se révoltent, jusqu’à l’impossible mesure du temps, ce sont autant de récits de notre humanité qui se déroulent dans ces pages. L’ouvrage, qui fait la part belle à l’image, est construit en sept grands chapitres, émaillés de textes littéraires, scientifiques ou poétiques, et nous fait découvrir ou redécouvrir une grande variété d’oeuvres de toutes époques et tous médiums : I – Des pierres qui ont toujours couché dehors : Jean Dubuffet, Auguste Rodin, Evariste Richer, Dove Allouche, Constantin Brancusi, Louis Daguerre, Charlotte Perriand, Fernand Léger, Giuseppe Penone, John Ruskin, Vija Celmins, Alexandre Isidore Leroy de Barde, Ugo Rondinone, Alicja Kwade, Stéphane Thidet, Julian Charrière, Tatiana Trouvé, Gabriel Orozco. II – L’avare architecture des cristaux : André Breton, Pablo Picasso, Brassaï, Damien Hirst, Frédéric Bruly Bouabré, Wenzel Hablik, Juliette Agnel, Albert Renger-Patszch, Lyonel Feininger, Edouard Riou, Jean-Baptiste Louis Romé de L’Isle, Étienne Chambaud, Joseph Sima III – L’invincible attrait de l’analogie : le Facteur Cheval, Aurélien Froment, George Sand, John Cage, Erik Dietman, Antoine Bourdelle, Pieter Hugo, Edward Weston, Jean-Claude Ruggirello, Jean-Michel Sanejouand, Pierre-Luc-Charles Ciceri, Juva, Il Beccafumi, Abdelkader Benchamma, Antonio Tempesta, Sigismondo Laire. IV – Certaines pierres sont divines : statuaire antique indienne, étrusque, gauloise, Giorgio Vasari, Victor Brauner, Henry Moore, Albrecht Dürer, Jean-Michel Alberola, Francesco Francia, Luca Signorelli, Carl Gustav Carus, Victor Brauner, Nicolas Dipre, Gioacchino Assereto, Hans Baldung Grien, Rose Salane. V – Pierres révoltées : Gilles Caron, Guido Reni, Meret Oppenheim, Robert Filliou, Esther Ferrer, Éric Feferberg, Wolfgang Mattheuer. VI – Des pierres plus âgées que la vie : Ana Mendieta, Paul Klee, Sim Chi Yin, Kapwani Kiwanga, Robert Smithson, Laura Grisi, Jacques Grison, Jimmie Durham, Hercules Pietersz Seghers, Jean-Pierre Houël. VII – Elles seules existent sur les étoiles : Richard Long, Andrea Branzi, Sabine Mirlesse, Agnieszka Kurant, Parviz Kimiavi, Lucien Pelen, Gino De Dominicis, Théo Mercier.

Over the past two decades, French artist Pierre Huyghe has produced an extraordinary body of work in constant dialogue with temporality. Investigating the possibility of a hypothetical mode of timekeeping–“parallel presents”– Huyghe has researched the architecture of the incomplete, directed a puppet opera, founded a temporary school, established a pirate television station, staged celebrations, scripted scenarios, and journeyed to Antarctica in search of a mythological penguin. In this first book-length art historical examination of Huyghe and his work, Amelia Barikin traces the artist’s continual negotiation with the time codes of contemporary society. Offering detailed analyses of Huyghe’s works and drawing on extensive interviews with Huyghe and his associates, Barikin finds in Huyghe’s projects an alternate way of thinking about history–a “topological historicity” that deprograms (or reprograms) temporal formats. Huyghe once said, “It is through the montage, the way we combine and relate images, that we can create a representation of an event that is perhaps more precise than the event itself.”Barikin offers pioneering analyses of Huyghe’s lesser-known early works as well as sustained readings of later, critically acclaimed projects, including No Ghost Just a Shell (2000), L’Expédition scintillante (2002), and A Journey That Wasn’t (2005). She emphasizes Huyghe’s concepts of “freed time” and “the open present,” in which anything might happen. Bringing together an eclectic array of subjects and characters–from moon walking to situationist practices, from Snow White to Gilles Deleuze– Parallel Presents offers a highly original account of the driving forces behind Huyghe’s work

Little Nemo, Yellow Kid, Tintin, Blake et Mortimer, Mickey, Superman, Astérix, Iznogoud, Blueberry, Astro Boy, Le Chat… Ces personnages et héros nés sous la plumes des plus grands auteurs de bande dessinée n’ont pas simplement fait les délices de millions de lecteurs à travers le monde ; ils ont aussi nourri l’imaginaire de certains artistes importants de notre époque, tels Roy Lichtenstein, Erro, Takashi Murakami, Wim Delvoye ou Gilles Barbier, pour n’en citer que quelques-uns. Publié à l’occasion de l’exposition Vraoum ! trésors de la bande dessinée et art contemporain à la maison rouge, cet ouvrage s’ouvre par les textes des commissaires, David Rosenberg et Pierre Sterckx, mis en images par Sylvain Paris, et retrace le parcours de l’exposition en confrontant des planches originales parmi les plus rares ou les plus célèbres de l’histoire du 9° Art aux oeuvres contemporaines qu’elles ont inspirées.

500 superb images represent the world’s best photographers and encompass every sort of photography in this eye-catching and engrossing book. Pictures of famous events such as the Royal Wedding and the first landing on the moon are here, next to familiar shots by masters of photography such as Bill Brandt, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Cecil Beaton and Robert Doisneau. There is fashion, sport, natural history, reportage and society portraiture, as well as social documentary and art. The 500 photographers featured range from William Henry Fox Talbot and Julia Margaret Cameron to Larry Clarke and Herb Rittz, from Robert Capa and Josef Koudelka to Nan Goldin and Pierre et Gilles. Arranged alphabetically by photographer, each full-page image is accompanied by an illuminating text which gives a useful insight into the work and its creator, as well as extensive cross-references to others working in the same field or the same style. Glossaries of technical terms and movements and a directory of museums and galleries are included to provide a fully comprehensive and self-contained volume.

This is a book about the public display of death in contemporary culture. It consists of a series of essays on specific cases in which death is displayed in museums and in photography. The essays focus mainly on representations of violence and death in events in recent Israeli history, including the assassination of Yitzhak Rabin and the Palestinian Intifada, and on the visual presence of traumatic events in Israeli culture throughout the twentieth century. They show how images of these events both shape and aestheticize the viewer’s experience of death. The book offers a new reading of the work of Walter Benjamin, particularly his essay “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.” Engaging the disciplinary perspectives of philosophy, art history, cultural studies, and photographic theory, the book also draws upon the work of such writers as Jean Baudrillard, Pierre Bourdieu, Gilles Deleuze, Michel Foucault, Jurgen Habermas, Jean-Francois Lyotard, and Jean-Luc Nancy.

This book presents 123 calling cards of artists (painters, sculptors, photographers, architects, graphic designers, illustrators etc.) from the 18th century to the present day. The facsimiled cards are slipped like bookmarks into a book by several authors on the history of the use of calling cards, the social context in which they were produced, and related historical and fictional narratives. The often unexpected graphic qualities of these personalized objects, each designed to capture an individual identity within the narrow confines of a tiny rectangle card, implicitly recount a history of taste and typographic codes in the West. But this calling card collection also lays the foundations for a microhistory of art, inspired by the Italian microstoria, or a looser narrative that breaks free from geographic contexts and historical periods. We can imagine how social networks were formed before the advent of Facebook, and how artists defined themselves in the social sphere, whether they were students or teachers, dean of the art school or museum curator, founder of a journal, firm, restaurant or political party, and so on. Superimposed on this imaginary or idealized network formed by chance encounters is a living network of students of art or history, historians or anthropologists, librarians, archivists, gallerists, museum curators and artists themselves, the network upon which this pocket museum is constructed. The sheer variety of perspectives and stories brought together here makes this book a prodigious forum for discussion. The carded artists include: Absalon, Anni and Josef Albers, John Armleder, Iain Baxter, Larry Bell, Joseph Beuys, Joseph Binder, Max Bill, Pierrette Bloch, Rosa Bonheur, Irma Boom, Aglaüs Bouvenne, Constantin Brancusi, Marcel Broodthaers, Antonio Canova, Caran d’Ache, A.M. Cassandre, Chenue malletier, Iris Clert, Claude Closky, Le Corbusier, Silvie Défraoui, Sonia Delaunay, Fortunato Depero, Marcel Duchamp, A.R. Dunton, Céline Duval, Nathalie Du Pasquier, Yan Duyvendak, Daniel Eatock, Edward Fella, Sylvie Fleury, Schwestern Flöge, Piero Fornasetti, Hans Frank, Lene Frank, Emile Gallé, General Idea, Dan Graham, Wolfgang von Gœthe, Jean-Baptiste Greuze, Walter Gropius, Guerrilla Girls, Hector Guimard, Friedrich Haeffcke, Raymond Hains, Keith Haring, Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield, Anton Herrgesell, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Ray Johnson, Ana Jotta, Wassily Kandinsky, André Kertész, Martin Kippenberger, Paul Klee, Johann Adam Klein, Yves Klein, Július Koller, Joseph Kosuth, Yayoi Kusama, Carl Gotthard Langhans, Fernand Léger, Pierre Leguillon, George Maciunas, Robert Mallet-Stevens, Edouard Manet, Piero Manzoni, Christian Marclay, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Karel Martens, Annette Messager, Lucia Moholy, Piet Mondrian, Valérie Mréjen, Félix Nadar, Isamu Noguchi, The Offices of Jenny Holzer, Peter Nadin, Richard Prince and al., Yoko Ono, Claes Oldenburg, Nam June Paik, Francis Picabia, Adrian Piper, Emil Pirchan, Man Ray, Les ready made appartiennent à tout le monde®, Carl August Reinhardt, Gerrit Rietveld, Auguste Rodin, Edward Ruscha, Alexander Search, Willem Sandberg, Erik Satie, Gino Severini, Johan Gottfried Schadow, Egon Schiele, Oskar Schlemmer, Käthe Schmidt, Roman Signer, Alec Soth, Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas, Jack Smith, Hélène Smith, Harald Szeemann, Sophie Taeuber, Karel Teige, Oliviero Toscani, Theo van Doesburg, Roman Vishniac, Andy Warhol, Weegee, Neill Whistler, Heimo Zobernig, Piet Zwart, Emmy Zweybrück Prochaska With texts by: Samuel Adams, Damarice Amao, Daniel Baumann, Stuart Bertolotti-Bailey, Géraldine Beck, Paul Bernard, Christian Besson, Christianna Bonin, Véronique Borgeaud, Marie de Brugerolle, Garance Chabert, Kyrill Charbonnel, Yann Chateigné, Manuel Cirauqui, Chiara Costa, Caroline Coutau, Jean-Baptiste Delorme, Carla Demierre, Dakota DeVos, Corinne Diserens, Eva Fabbris, Patricia Falguières, Arthur Fink, Sophie Gayerie, Kati Gegenheimer, Mark Thomas Gibson, Nicolas Giraud, Victor Guégan, Andrea Gyorody, Nastassja Haidinger, Dean Inkster, Aurélie Jacquet, Elisabeth Jobin, Vincent Jolivet, Moritz Küng, Angela Lampe, Charlotte Laubard, Anaël Lejeune, Quentin Lannes, Pierre Leguillon, Charlotte Magnin, Nicole Marchand-Zañartu, Valérie Mavridorakis, Aurélien Mole, Michael J. Moore, Adrien Mouginot, Christiane Mühlegger, Émilie Parendeau, Ying Sze Pek, Corine Pencenat, Mathias Pfund, Fabien Pinaroli, Raphaël Pirenne, Paulo Pires do Vale, Carrie Pilto, Frans Postma, Jeanne Quéheillard, Fabienne Radi, Ivan Ristić, Vincent de Roguin, Paul-Louis Roubert, Margot Sanitas, Gilles Saussier, Elana Shapira, Klaus-Peter Speidel, Friedrich Tietjen, Rebecca Topakian, Gesine Tosin, Xiaoda Wang, Christophe Wavelet, David Zerbib, Célia Zuber.
Co-published by HEAD – Genève (Geneva University of Art and Design) and Edition Patrick Frey under the patronage of the Museum of Mistakes Editors: Pierre Leguillon in collaboration with Barbara Fédier and Kyrill Charbonnel, Pauline Cordier, Aurélie Jacquet, Aline Melaet, Anaïs Perez, and Charlotte Schaer, students of WorkMaster at HEAD – Genève

Situation–a unique set of conditions produced in both space and time and ranging across material, social, political, and economic relations–has become a key concept in twenty-first-century art. Rooted in artistic practices of the 1960s and 1970s, the idea of situation has evolved and transcended these in the current context of globalization. This anthology offers key writings on areas of art practice and theory related to situation, including notions of the site specific, the artist as ethnographer or fieldworker, the relation between action and public space, the meaning of place and locality, and the crucial role of the curator in recent situation specific art. In North America and Europe, the site-specific is often viewed in terms of resistance to art’s commoditization, while elsewhere situation-specific practices have defied institutions of authority. The contributors discuss these recent tendencies in the context of proliferating international biennial exhibitions, curatorial place-bound projects, and strategies by which artists increasingly unsettle the definition and legitimation of situation-based art.Artists surveyed include [from Ian 1/30]Vito Acconci, Allora & Calzadilla, Francis Alÿs, Carl Andre, Artist Placement Group, Michael Asher, Amy Balkin, Ursula Biemann, Bik Van der Pol, Daniel Buren, Victor Burgin, Janet Cardiff, Center for Land Use Interpretation, Adam Chodzko, Collective Actions, Tacita Dean, Elmgreen & Dragset, Andrea Fraser, Hamish Fulton, Dan Graham, Liam Gillick, Renée Green, Group Material, Douglas Huebler, Bethan Huws, Pierre Huyghe, Robert Irwin, Emily Jacir, Ilya Kabakov, Leopold Kessler, Július Koller, Langlands & Bell, Ligna, Richard Long, Gordon Matta-Clark, Graeme Miller, Jonathan Monk, Robert Morris, Gabriel Orozco, Walid Ra’ad, Raqs Media Collective, Paul Rooney, Martha Rosler, Allen Ruppersberg, Richard Serra, Situationist International, Tony Smith, Robert Smithson, Vivan Sundaram, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Lawrence Weiner, Rachel Whiteread, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Qiu Zhijie Writers include Arjun Appaduri, Marc Augé, Wim Beeren, Josephine Berry Slater, Daniel Birnbaum, Ava Bromberg, Susan Buck-Morss, Michel de Certeau, Douglas Crimp, Gilles Deleuze, T. J. Demos, Rosalyn Deutsche, Thierry de Duve, Charles Esche, Graeme Evans, Patricia Falguières, Marina Fokidis, Hal Foster, Hou Hanrou, Brian Holmes, Mary Jane Jacob, Vasif Kortun, Miwon Kwon, Lu Jie, Doreen Massey, James Meyer, Ivo Mesquita, Brian O’Doherty, Craig Owens, Irit Rogoff, Peter Weibel

45 graphic designers, 90 photographs, 10 years of books on contemporary art. This book is based on an invitation to graphic designers to choose two books on contemporary art from the past decade whose design they think is particularly pertinent to the content, to photograph one double-page spread from each book and, if they wish, to comment on their choices. Double Page provides a selection of recent art publications as viewed by graphic designers who are internationally known for their contribution to that field, and offers a glimpse at the role of book design today in our knowledge and understanding of contemporary art. Shedding light on this prevalent relationship between art and graphic design by means of photography, Double Page constitutes an unprecedented document of how graphic designers see the work of their peers and their own practices as an essential part of the editorial process. Contributors: Philipp Arnold, Stuart Bailey, Ludovic Balland (Typography Cabinet), Jean-Marc Ballée, Peter Bilak (Typotheque), Julia Born, Change is Good (José Albergaria & Rik Bas Backer), Jocelyn Cottencin (Lieuxcommuns), Jean-Marie Courant (Regular), Sara De Bondt, Linda van Deursen & Armand Mevis (Mevis & van Deursen), deValence (Alexandre Dimos & Gaël Étienne), Markus Dreßen (Spector), Daniel Eatock, Gavillet & Rust (Gilles Gavillet, David Rust), Christian Haas (Raffinerie AG für Gestaltung), Will Holder, Simon Josebury (Secondary Modern), Erik Kessels (KesselsKramer), Kummer & Herrman (Arthur Herrman, Jeroen Kummer), Aude Lehmann, Lehni-Trueb (Urs Lehni and Lex Trueb), Joseph Logan, Jonathan Maghen (Textfield), Mike Meiré, Maureen Mooren, Stephan Müller (Müller & Wesse), NORM (Dimitri Bruni & Manuel Krebs), Warren Olds (Studio Ahoy), Tania Prill, Alberto Vieceli (Prill & Vieceli), Purtill Family Business, Yvonne Quirmbach, Manuel Raeder, David Reinfurt (Dexter Sinister, O-R-G), Alex Rich, Georg Rutishauser, Benjamin Sommerhalder (Nieves), Christoph Steinegger (Interkool), Jon Sueda & Gail Swanlund (Stripe) Frédéric Teschner, Alexia de Visscher & Pierre Huyguebaert (Speculoos, SPRL), Markus Weisbeck, Dorothea Weishaupt (groenlandbasel), Roger Willems (Roma), Michael Worthington (Counterspace). Edited by Christophe Keller, Jérôme Saint-Loubert Bié, Catherine de Smet Graphic Design: Caroline Fabès & Joséphine Guérin with Jérôme Saint-Loubert Bié. Copublished with École régionale des Beaux-Arts de Rennes

Artists: MORA, Gilles, SEKAER, Peter, HILL, John T., MODOTTI, Tina, ALBERS, Patricia, STOURDZE, Sam, SAYAG, Alain, NIXON, Nicholas, GALASSI, Peter, FUKASE, Masahisa, YAMAGISHI, Koko, WESTON, Edward, TUGGENER, Jakob, GASSER, Martin, SOMMER, Frederick, DURAND, Régis, MATTER, Herbert, HEINECKEN, Robert, PITTS, Terence, STAHEL, Urs, ALBEROLA, Jean-Michel, DRAHOS, Tom, MILLET, Bernard, GRANCHER, Valéry, RONIS, Willy, BONHOMME, Pierre, RIGOLINI, Luciano, MILOVANOFF, Christian, BAZZOLI, François, BAUDRILLARD, Jean, GUNTHERT, André, CLERGUE, Lucien, ALDRICH, Stephen, COLEMAN, A.D., FURUYA, Seiichi, FABER, Monika, FUCHS, Daniel and Geo, WILLIAMS, Val, CALLE, Sophie

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