A two volume exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with an exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum from April 15 – June 8, 1965. “Deel 1 Teksten” contains artist biographies and “Deel 2 Foto’s” is comprised of photographs of the work exhibited. Includes work by Lucio Fontana, Enrico Castellani, Piero Manzoni, Pol bury, Yayoi Kusama, Hans Haacke, Yves Klein, Otto Piene, Soto, Heinz Mack, Gunther Uëcker, Gutai, Armando, Jan Schoonhoven, George Rickey, Getulio Alviani.

The Situationist times was Jacqueline de Jong’s enaction of her situation, one in which rather than proclaiming, stating, critiquing, and expelling, she was living and thinking, on her own and with others; and publishing those results, internationally. A fascinating compendium of rhizomatic thought, a printed dérive including quotes, political documents, and images, to peruse, to look at and to read the 6 issues of The Situationist Times would nuance and enlighten our perceptions about this convoluted moment in Western societies, and in particular, this international attempt at figuring out how to continue to be artistically and politically involved under a totalizing economic system. Offprint of the issue about the problem of ‘the ring, interlaced rings and consequently, chains’, with contributions by Asger Jorn, Max Bucaille, Pol Bury and others

Multiples by: John L. Tancock, Abe Ajay, Otmar Alt, Arman, Jean Arp, Richard Artschwager,Enrico Baj, Mary Bauermeister, Miguel Berrocal, Joseph Beuys, Max Bill, Mel Bochner, Sandro Bocola, Hartmut Bohm, Agostino Bonalumi, Victor Bonato,Davide Boriani, Derek Boshier, Martha Boto, David Bradshaw, K.P. Brehmer,Marcel Broodthaers, Robert Bryant, Ursula Burghardt, Pol Bury, John Cage,Alexander Calder, Malcolm Carder, Enrico Castellani, Alik Cavaliere, Mario Ceroli, Thomas Chimes, Christo, Chryssa, Genevieve Claisse, Gianni Colombo,Kenelm Cox, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Bill Culbert, Allan D’Arcangelo, Sandro de Alexandris, Lucio Del Pezzo, H.R. Demarco, Walter De Maria, Jim Dine, Herbert Distel, Francesco Marino di Teana, Piero Dorazio, Angel Duarte, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Michel Fadt, Rafael Ferrer, Robert Filliou, Lucio Fontana,Horacio Garcia-Rossi, Karl Gerstner, Gilbert & George, Ludwig Gosewitz, Hans Haacke, Raymond Hains, Etienne Hajdu, Richard Hamilton, Maurice Henry,Eva Hesse, Charles Hinman, Karl Horst Dodicke, Douglas Huebler, Fritz Hendertwasser, Jean Ipousteguy, Allen Jones, Howard Jones, Donald Judd,Iwao Kagoshima, Stephen Kaltenbach, Pierre Keller, Milan Knizak, Piotr Kowalski, David Lamelas, Fernand Leger, Julio Le Parc, Sol LeWitt, Roy Lichtenstein, Shoji Lida, Liliane Lijn, Richard Lindner, Yuan-Chia Li, Bernard Luginbuhl, Adolf Luther, Rene Magritte, Piero Manzoni, Enzo Mari, Marisol,Gino Marotta, Henri Matisse, Paul Matisse, Rory McEwen, Tomio Miki, Marcello Morandini, Francois Morellet, Robert Morris, Bruno Munari, Bruce Nauman,Louise Nevelson, Kazuo Okazaki, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, George Ortman, Claus Paeffgen, Palermo, Pavlos, Henry Pearson, David Pelham, Alicia Penalba, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Sigmar Polke, Arnaldo Pomodoro, Gio Pomodoro, William Pye, Edival Ramosa, Robert Rauschenberg, May Ray, Martial Raysse, Paul Reich, George Rickey, Larry Rivers, James Rosenquist, Dieter Rot [Dieter Roth], Mimmo Rotella, Gerhard Rühm, Edward Ruscha, Lucas Samaras,Remo Saraceni, Pedroni Sarenco, Alan Saret, Nicholas Schoffer, Peter Sedgley,George Segal, Richard Serra, Richard Smith, Tony Smith, Robert Smithson,Kenneth Snelson, Francisco Sobrino, Keith Sonnier, Jesus Raphael Soto, Daniel Spoerri, Klaus Staeck, Klaus Staudt, Joel Stein, Saul Steinberg, Kumi Sugai,George Sugarman, Takis, Paul Palman, Takao Tanabe, Andre Thomkins, Joe Tilson, Jean Tinguely, Luis Tomasello, David Tremlett, Ernest Trova, Michael Tyzack, Raoul Ubac, Gunther Uecker, De Wain Valentine, Gregorio Vardanega,Victor Vasarely, Wolf Vostell, Andy Warhol, Willy Weber, Lawrence Weiner,Gunter Wesler, Ludwig Wilding, Jean Pierre Yvaral

“A comprehensive study of the field of kinetic art which, although practiced by many notable artists, has remained relatively hidden from a large audience because of its under-representation in art museums and publications. Force Fields examines the entire history of the art form, covering works from the 1920’s through the 1980’s. Featured artists include Marcel Duchamp, Lazslo Moholy-Nagy, Alexander Calder, Lucio Fontana, Yves Klein, Piero Manzoni, Jean Tinguely, Henri Michaux, James Whitney, Takis, Fran ois Morellet, Jesus Rafael Soto, Pol Bury, Sergio Camargo, Sol LeWitt, Gego, Helio Oticia, Mira Schendel, Lygia Clark, Robert Smithson, Gordon Matta-Clark, Agnes Denes, Hans Haacke, Medalla, Dieter Roth, Len Lye, Liliane Lijn, Julio le Parc, Li Yuan-Chia, Dom Sylvester Houedard, Leandre Crist/fol and John Latham, among others.”

Since the early 1990s, Wolfgang Tillmans (b. 1968) has established himself as one of the most exciting and innovative artists working today. The first photographer to win the Turner Prize (in 2000), his work is characterized by constant investigation into the boundaries of the photographic medium and a preoccupation with the process of photography itself. This new book, which accompanied an exhibition at Tate Modern, examines Tillmans’s evolving practice, showcasing his photography but also his video, digital slide projections, publications, and recorded music. Essays offer an overarching view of Tillmans’s work, from the physical materiality of his art to space and installation to his use of abstraction, and his relationship with politics and society, with particular emphasis on events of the last 15 years. The book is designed by the artist, and has a strong visual identity. Photography and video stills are beautifully reproduced in full color while, in keeping with the artist’s nonhierarchical approach to media, documentary material is also highlighted.
 

Technological optimism, even utopianism, was widespread at midcentury; in Britain, Harold Wilson in 1963 promised a new nation “forged from the white heat of the technological revolution.” In this heady atmosphere, pioneering artists transformed the cold logic of computing into a new medium for their art and played a central role in connecting technology and culture. White Heat Cold Logic tells the story of these early British digital and computer artistsóand fills in a missing chapter in contemporary art history.

In this heroic period of computer art, artists were required to build their own machines, collaborate closely with computer scientists, and learn difficult computer languages. White Heat Cold Logic’s chapters, many written by computer art pioneers themselves, describe the influence of cybernetics, with its emphasis on process and interactivity; the connections to the constructivist movement; and the importance of work done in such different venues as commercial animation, fine art schools, and polytechnics.

The advent of personal computing and graphical user interfaces in 1980 signaled the end of an era, and today we do not have so many dreams of technological utopia. And yet our highly technologized and mediated world owes much to these early practitioners, especially for expanding our sense of what we can do with new technologies.

Contributors: Roy Ascott, Stephen Bell, Paul Brown, Stephen Bury, Harold Cohen, Ernest Edmonds, Maria Fernandez, Simon Ford, John Hamilton Frazer, Jeremy Gardiner, Charlie Gere, Adrian Glew, Beryl Graham, Stan Hayward, Graham Howard, Richard Ihnatowicz, Malcolm Le Grice, Tony Longson, Brent MacGregor, George Mallen, Catherine Mason, Jasia Reichardt, Stephen A. R. Scrivener, Brian Reffin Smith, Alan Sutcliffe, Doron D. Swade, John Vince, Richard Wright, Aleksandar Zivanovic.

A Leonardo Book

This insightful book is the first to present a comprehensive survey of the Modernist movement as it emerged in America between 1920 and 1960 in various graphic media. It identifies and examines great works in advertising, information design, identity, magazine design, print, dimensional design, and posters that by mid-century had defined American graphic design. R. Roger Remington begins by discussing the emergence of Modernism and its major historical influences, including European avant-garde art movements, technology, geopolitical issues, popular culture, educational innovations such as the Bauhaus, architecture, industrial design, and photography. The heart of the book brings together the key works of mid-century Modernism, presenting them chronologically from the 1930s to the 1950s. The final section shows the impact of and reactions to these Modernist influences as graphic design in America matured into the 1960s and beyond. Handsomely designed and illustrated, American Modernism is destined to become,a classic text in the study of design and visual culture. Contents Preface The Basis for the New: The Cradle of Modernism, 1850-1899 A New World Forming: The Impact of Modernism, 1900-1919 American Design in Transition: Traditional to Modernism, 1920-1929 Into the Design Scene: Modernism Arrives in America, 1930-1939 At War and After: The Creative Forties in America, 1940-1949 A New Style: American Design at Mid-Century, 1950-1959 Design Since Mid-Century: Diversity and Contradiction, 1960-1999 Notes Bibliography Picture credits Acknowledgements Contains work by Alvin Lustig, Alvar Aalto, Dr. Mehemed Fehmy Agha, Constantin Alajalov, Josef Albers, Alexander Archipenko, Merle Armitage, Frank Barr, Hans Barschel, Saul Bass, Bauhaus, Willy Baumeister, Herbert Bayer, Lester Beall, Max Beckmann, Norman Bel Geddes, Morris Benton, Henryk Berlewi, Lucian Bernhard, Joseph Binder, Ernst Bohm, Will Bradley, Georges Braque, Frances Brennan, Marcel Breuer, Alexey Brodovitch, Max Burchartz, Will Burtin, Jean Carlu, David Carson, Melbert Cary, A. M. Cassandre, Ernest Caulkins, Cherryburn Press, Arthur Cohen, Charles Coiner, Container Corporation of America, Cranbrook Academy of Art, Louis Danziger, Claude Debussy, Rudolph De Harak, Fortunato Depero, Donald Deskey, De Stijl, Deutscher Werkbund, Walter Dexel, Otto Dix, Cesar Domela, Henry Dreyfuss, William Addison (W. A.) Dwiggins, Charles Eames, Milton Feasley, Gene Federico, Max Fleischer, Fortune Magazine, Dan Friedman, Leon Friend, Robert Gage, Sigfried Giedion, George Giusti, Milton Glaser, William Golden, Morton Goldsholl, Frederick Goudy, April Greiman, Glenn Grohe, Walter Gropius, George Grosz, Edmund Guess, Jay Hambridge, Richard Edes Harrison, Baron Georges Eugene Hausmann, Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield, Hannah Hoch, Hans Hofmann, Gerald Holton, Clarence Hornung, Johannes Itten, Egbert Jacobsen, S. A. Jacobs, Robert Jensen, Philip Johnson, Bobby Jones, L. B. Jones, Wassily Kandinsky, Susan Kare, Edward McKnight Kauffer, Rockwell Kent, Gyorgy Kepes, Frederick Kiesler, Paul Klee, Knoll Furniture Company, Rudolph Koch, Willi Kunz, Le Corbusier, Fernand Leger, Alexander Liberman, Leo Lionni, El Lisstsky, George Lois, William Longhauser, Herb Lubalin, Katherine McCoy, Douglas McMurtrie, James Mangan, Man Ray, John Massey, Herbert Matter, Rollo May, Ludwig Meidner, R. Hunter Middleton, Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Otto Mueller, Otto Neurath, Olivetti, Maxfield Parrish, Art Paul, Paul Theobald & Company, Sir Joseph Paxton, Max Pechstein, Charles Pegay, John Pemberton, Edward Penfield, Pablo Picasso, Cipe Pineles, Giovanni Pintori, PM Magazine, Ezra Pound, Push Pin Studios, Paul Rand, Paul Renner, Frank Robinson, Bruce Rogers, Gilbert Rohde, Lester Rondell, George Salter, L. Sandusky, Paula Scher, Kurt Schwitters, Joseph Sinel, Mino Somenzi, Edward Steichen, Alex Steinweiss, Otto Storch, Paul Strand, Ladislav Sutnar, Walter Dorwin Teague, Bradbury Thompson, Karl Tiege, A. Tolmer, Jan Tschichold, Massimo Vignelli, Vogue Magazine, James Watt, Wolfgang Weingart, Westvaco, Wes Wilson, Henry Wolf, Frank Lloyd Wright, Piet Zwart, and others.

Imagine an area the size of a small city centre, bristling with buildings set in beautiful gardens; fill the buildings with every type of commodity and activity, in the largest possible quantities; invite all nations on earth to take part, sparing no expense. After six months, raze this city to the ground and leave nothing behind, save a number of landmarks intended to survive and to go on to serve a new purpose. The World’s Fairs, held since 1851, were occurrences such as these, spectacular gestures which briefly held the world s attention before disappearing. Millions of visitors strolled through the sites, urban centres were re-planned to accommodate them, national economies were damaged, fortunes made and international hostilities postponed. In Paul Greenhalgh s beautifully illustrated book some forty expositions are dealt with in detail and many more are described. From America, Britain and France key countries in forming the exhibition tradition to Amsterdam, Antwerp, Barcelona, Brussels, Dublin, Montreal, Moscow, Osaka, Shanghai, Vienna and Turin. Fair World enlightens the reader on the fairs key periods in history including the belle epoch between 1875 and 1915 the golden age of exhibitions where over fifty major expos were held and the age of Futuropolis from 1925 to 1970. About the Author Paul Greenhalgh is Director of the Sainsbury Centre for the Visual Arts at the University of East Anglia. His former roles include Director and President of the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington DC, President of NSCAD University in Canada, and Head of Research at the V&A Museum in London.

Hal Fischer’s Gay Semiotics: A Photographic Study of Visual Coding Among Homosexual Men (1977) is one of the most important publications associated with California conceptual photography in the 1970s. This new edition reproduces the look and feel of the original volume, which reconfigured into a book format the 24 text-embedded images of Fischer’s 1977 photographic series Gay Semiotics. The photographs in Gay Semiotics present the codes of sexual orientation and identification Fischer saw in San Francisco’s Castro and Haight Ashbury districts, ranging from such sexual signifiers as handkerchiefs and keys to depictions of the gay fashion “types” of that era–from “basic gay” to “hippie” and “jock.” Gay Semiotics also features Fischer’s critical essay, which is marked by the same wry, anthropological tone found in the image/text configurations. Fischer’s book circulated widely, finding a worldwide audience in both the gay and conceptual art communities.
Fischer’s insistence on the visual equivalence of word and image is a hallmark of the loose photography and language group that included Fischer, Lutz Bacher, Lew Thomas and others working in the San Francisco Bay Area. First published as an artist’s book in 1978 by NFS Press, at a time when gay people had been forced to both evaluate and defend their lifestyles, Gay Semiotics earned substantial critical and public recognition. Thirty-seven years later, the book remains a proactive statement from a voice within the gay community from a moment in history just before the devastation wrought by AIDS.
Hal Fischer (born 1950) grew up in Highland Park, Illinois. He arrived in San Francisco in 1975 to pursue an MA in photography at San Francisco State. Through his work as an art reviewer and photographer, he soon became embedded in the Bay Area’s artistic and intellectual scene. He continues to live and work in San Francisco.

Includes “exclusive photographs from the notorious Haight-Ashbury district by the photographer who lived among the hippies” (cover blurb). Contains hilarious anti-hippie diatribes from a doctor, police officer, judge, social worker, hippie landlord, journalist, and Hell’s Angel. Profusely photo-illustrated throughout. Brief lexicon of ‘Psychedelic Slanguage’.

In 1966 she synthesized the essence of the Free Speech Movement and the nascent Hippie Movement/Love One Another vibe that was to grow into 1967’s Summer of Love, writing and publishing this incendiary erotic masterpiece of modern poetry. The Love Book’s four poems celebrate the divine nature of sexuality, offering a potent and eloquent testament to physical, sexual love, succinct and full of explicit language. That explicit language led to the book being confiscated by San Francisco police in November 1966, with raids on City Lights Bookstore and the Haight-Ashbury District’s Psychedelic Shop which led to the arrest of three booksellers. The obscenity trial that followed was at the time the longest running trial in San Francisco history. That court’s guilty verdict was appealed all the way to the California Supreme Court, which upheld the obscenity ruling in 1967. That conviction was overturned by a Federal District Court in 1974.

Hal Fischer’s 1977 photographic study, is a curious anthropological exploration of gay culture. The pictures are taken in and around San Francisco’s gay enclaves, Castro Street and Haight Ashbury, during an exciting and significant period in gay history. Fischer was thus suitably placed to capture the newly found liberation of gay America during this post-stonewall and pre-AIDS period. His focus is mainly on the semiotic language of dress and the signalling devices intended for a male response. He adds diagrammatic annotations to his archetypal images, such as the difference between a right (aggressive) or left (passive) ear piercing, the behavioural tendencies of a man wearing a red handkerchief in his back pocket at a leather bar, the place of amyl nitrate and many more signifiers which to a contemporary eye almost feel stereotypical but at the time were brave statements about homosexuality. The project was Fischer’s response to the lack of any books or written information dealing with the visual iconography of the gay lifestyle at this time, but in retrospect it is hard to ascertain whether the images are intended to be purely academic or playfully irreverent.

Though we think of the 1960s and the early ‘70s as a time of radical social, cultural, and political upheaval, we tend to picture the action as happening on campuses and in the streets. Yet the rise of the underground newspaper was equally daring and original. Thanks to advances in cheap offset printing, groups involved in antiwar, civil rights, and other social liberation issues began to spread their messages through provocatively designed newspapers and broadsheets. This vibrant new media was essential to the counterculture revolution as a whole—helping to motivate the masses and proliferate ideas. Power to the People presents more than 700 full-color images and excerpts from these astonishing publications, many of which have not been seen since they were first published almost fifty years ago. From the psychedelic pages of the Oracle, Haight-Ashbury’s paper of choice, to the fiery editorials of the Black Panther Party Paper, these papers were remarkable for their editors’ fervent belief in freedom of expression and their DIY philosophy. They were also extraordinary for their graphic innovations. Experimental typography and wildly inventive layouts reflect an alternative media culture as much informed by the space age, television, and socialism as it was by the great trinity of sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll. Assembled by renowned graphic designer Geoff Kaplan, Power to the People pays homage in its layout to the radical press. Beyond its unparalleled images, Power to the People includes essays by Gwen Allen, Bob Ostertag, and Fred Turner, as well as a series of recollections edited by Pamela M. Lee, all of which comment on the critical impact of the alternative press in the social and popular movements of those turbulent years. Power to the People treats the design practices of that moment as activism in its own right that offers a vehement challenge to the dominance of official media and a critical form of self-representation. No other book surveys in such variety the highly innovative graphic design of the underground press, and certainly no other book captures the era with such an unmatched eye toward its aesthetic and look. Power to the People is not just a major compendium of art from the ’60s and ’70s—it showcases how the radical media graphically fashioned the image of a countercultural revolution that still resounds to this day.

This is a provocative chronicle of the guerilla art movement that changed comics and popular culture forever. This comprehensive book follows the movements of about 50 artists from 1963 to 1975, the heyday of the underground comix movement. Through interviews with the participants and other materials, Rebel Visions is the most intimate look ever at the people and events that forged the phenomenon known as underground comix, from New York to San Francisco, from the corn belt to deep in the heart of Texas, beginning that day in 1968 when R. Crumb debuted Zap #1 from a baby carriage in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district. Rosenkranz spent over 30 years researching this book and acquiring the cooperation of every significant underground cartoonist who worked throughout this period, including Crumb, Gilbert (Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers) Shelton, Bill (Zippy) Griffith, Art (Maus) Spiegelman, Jack Jackson, S. Clay Wilson, Robert Williams, and many more. The book is illustrated with many never-before-seen drawings by all of the underground cartoonists and exclusive photographs.

The book is centered in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district, where Crumb and the rest of his Zap cronies commingled with the rest of the city’s countercultural scene, notably musicians like the Grateful Dead and Janis Joplin. The counterculture was omnipresent in San Francisco for those few years, with underground tabloids like Yellow Dog and the San Francisco Oracle steering the zeitgeist out-of-control, along with the music, political, and psychedelic drug scenes, all of which found a group of unlikely revolutionaries who drew cartoons right at the epicenter. This is the definitive book on a memorable and historic era.

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