Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with Art Metropole’s 10th Anniversary exhibition held November 17 – December 8, 1984. Designed by AA Bronson. Text by AA Bronson, John Goodwin, Christina Ritchie, and Peggy Gale. Includes an exhibition checklist and an Art Metropole chronology from 1974 – 1984. Indexes works by: Vito Acconci, Vincenzo Agnetti, Shelagh Alexander, Laurie Anderson, Carl Andre, Ant Farm, Eleanor Antin, Ida Applebroog, Shusaka Arakawa, Ryan Arnott, Robert Ashley, David Askevold, Alice Aycock, John Baldessari, Robert Barry, Carole Gallagher, Luciano Bartolini, Lothar Baumgarten, Joseph Beuys, Caroline Tisdall, Dara Birnbaum, Mel Bochner, Alighiero Boetti, Christian Boltanski, Pierre Boogaerts, Jonathan Borofsky, Brad Brace, George Brecht, Hans Breder, Marcel Broodthaers, Stanley Brouwn, David Buchan, Hank Bull, Daniel Buren, Victor Burgin, Michael Buthe, James Lee Byars, Richard C., Miriam Cahn, John Cage, Ulises Carrion, James Casebere, Sarah Charlesworth, Sandro Chia, Giuseppe Chiari, Robert Christo, Collective Chromazone, Heinz Cibulka, Francesco Clemente, James Collins, Claudio Costa, Robert Cumming, Greg Curnoe, Hanne Darboven, Lowel D. Darling, Juan Da Villa, Constance De Jong, Tom Dean, Mario Diacono, Antonio Dias, Jan Dibbets, Martin Disler, Jean Dubuffet, Marcel Duchamp, Mary Beth Edelson, Kit Edwards, Felipe Ehrenberg, Valie Export, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Robert Filliou, A.M. Fine, Hervé Fischer, Joel Fisher, Copp Fletcher, Robert Fones, Ken Friedman, Hamish Fulton, Phillip Galgiani, Eldon Garnet, Gilbert and George, Jochen Gerz, Michael Gibbs, Jon Gibson, Oliver Girling, Randy Gledhill, Tom Graff, Dan Graham, John Greer, Walther Gutman, Hans Haacke, Dieter Hacker, Noel Harding, Keith Haring, Stephen Harris, Matt Harley, Michael Heizer, Gerard Hemsworth, Jan Herman, Geoff Hendricks, Dick Higgins, Susan Hiller, Hans Hollein, Jenny Holzer, Rebecca Horn, Douglas Huebler, Sonja Ivekovic, Jasper Johns, Ray Johnson, Joe Jones, On Kawara, Anselm Kiefer, Kijkhuis, Yves Klein, John Knight, Richard Kostelanetz, Joseph Kosuth, Jannis Kounellis, Les Krims, David Lamelas, Bernard Lassus, Vera Lemecha, Les Levine, Sol LeWitt, Tina Lhotsky, Roy Lichtenstein, Colin Lochhead, Richard Long, Robert Longo, Nino Longobardi, Urs Luthi, George Maciunas, Allan Mackay, David MacWilliam, Paul Maenz, Arnaud Maggs, Liz Magor, John Massey, Hansjorg Mayer, Bruce McLean, Sandra Meigs, Mario Merz, Eric Metcalfe, Phillip Monk, Michael Morris, Muntadas, Ian Murray, Norman Ogue Mustill, Maurizio Nannucci, Opal L. Nations, Bruce Nauman, Linda Neaman, Al Neil, Hermann Nitsch, Barbara Noah, Arlene Golant, Claes Oldenburg, Luigi Ontani, Dennis Oppenheim, Nam June Paik, Giulio Paolini, Andy Patton, Steve Paxton, A.R. Penck, Giuseppe Penone, Bern Porter, Royden Rabinowitch, Marcus Rätz, Steve Reich, Lothar Reiners, James Riddle, David Rosenberg, Martha Rosler, Dieter Rot, Ed Ruscha, Lawerence Weiner, Reiner Ruthenbeck, Jim de Sana, Lucas Samaras, Bernd Schmitz, Carolee Schneemann, Rudolf Schwarzkogler, Kurt Schwitters, Tom Sherman, Chieko Shiomi, Seth Siegelaub, Jack Wendler, Michael Snow, Valerie Solanas, Daniel Spoerri, Klaus Staeck, Ernesto Tatafiore, Paul Thek, Edwin Klein, Vincent Trasov, John Mitchell, Richard Tuttle, Cy Twombly, Ulay, Roland Van Den Berghe, M. Vaughan-James, Ben Vautier, Bernar Venet, Claudio Verna, Wolf Vostell, Martin Walde, Jeff Wall, Duane Lunden, Ian Wallace, Andy Warhol, Robert Watts, George Whiteside, Robert Wiens, Stephan Willats, Emmett Williams, Martha Wilson, Robert Wilson, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Va Wölfl, Peter Wronski, Donna Wyszomierski, Keigo Yammamoto, La Monte Young, and R. Zybert.

The New York proto-punk zine that defined postconceptualism, now in a facsimile edition

Edited by Walter Robinson, Edit DeAk and Joshua Cohn, Art-Rite was published in New York City between 1973 and 1978. The periodical has long been celebrated for its underground/overground position and its cutting, humorous, on-the-streets coverage and critique of the art world. Art-Rite moved easily through the expansive community it mapped out, paying homage to an emergent generation of artists, including many who were―or would soon become―the defining voices of the era. Through hundreds of interviews, reviews, statements and projects for the page―as well as artist-focused and thematic issues on video, painting, performance and artists’ books―Art-Rite‘s sharp editorial vision and commitment to holding up the work of artists stands as a meaningful and lasting contribution to the art history of New York and beyond. All issues of Art-Rite are collected in this volume.

Artists include: Vito Acconci, Kathy Acker, Bas Jan Ader, Laurie Anderson, John Baldessari, Gregory Battcock, Lynda Benglis, Mel Bochner, Marcel Broodthaers, Trisha Brown, Chris Burden, Scott Burton, Ulises Carrión, Judy Chicago, Lucinda Childs, Christo, Diego Cortez, Hanne Darboven, Agnes Denes, Ralston Farina, Richard Foreman, Peggy Gale, Gilbert & George, John Giorno, Philip Glass, Leon Golub, Peter Grass, Julia Heyward, Nancy Holt, Ray Johnson, Joan Jonas, Richard Kern, Lee Krasner, Shigeko Kubota, Les Levine, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Babette Mangolte, Brice Marden, Agnes Martin, Gordon Matta-Clark, Rosemary Mayer, Annette Messager, Elizabeth Murray, Alice Neel, Brian O’Doherty, Genesis P-Orridge, Nam June Paik, Charlemagne Palestine, Judy Pfaff, Lil Picard, Yvonne Rainer, Dorothea Rockburne, Ed Ruscha, Robert Ryman, David Salle, Carolee Schneemann, Richard Serra, Jack Smith, Patti Smith, Robert Smithson, Holly Solomon, Naomi Spector, Nancy Spero, Pat Steir, Frank Stella, Alan Suicide (Vega), David Tremlett, Richard Tuttle, Andy Warhol, William Wegman, Lawrence Weiner, Hannah Wilke, Robert Wilson, Yuri and Irene von Zahn.

Pioneer avant-garde filmmaker, poet and artist Jonas Mekas (b. 1922) was the barometer of the New York art scene in the 1960s and 1970s. His interviews with Andy Warhol, Stan Brakhage, Susan Sontag, John Cassavetes, Carolee Schneemann, Yvonne Rainer and Claes Oldenberg, Kenneth Anger and Michael Snow, among many other avant-garde artists and filmmakers for his weekly column in the Village Voice between 1958 and 1977, are gathered here for the first time in this substantial publication. Originally recorded by Mekas using multiple mediums including film camera, still camera and tape recordings, 60 conversations have been transcribed. Peppered with photos or stills from his films, each interview is a record of the artistic vision of the late 20th century and also a wonderful scrapbook and visual document of these noted artists. Letters and extracts from related scripts and an index supplement the texts. Born in Lithuania, Mekas came to Brooklyn via Germany in 1949 and began shooting his first films there, developing a form of film diary to record his daily observations. This is Mekas s second publication with Spector Books following the acclaimed collection of his writings and reviews featured in Scrapbook of the Sixties. Mekas continues to produce interviews-over 70 years documenting and critiquing the reigning film and art scenes. Featured interviews include Jerome Hill, Vittorio De Seta, Gregory Markopoulos, Storm De Hirsch, George and Mike Kuchar, Mike Getz, Andy Warhol, Nico Papatakis, Taylor Mead, Claes Oldenburg, Shirley Clarke, Albert and David Maysles Tony Conrad, Peter Kubelka,Pier Paolo Pasolini, Ken Jacobs, Susan Sontag, John Cassavetes, Michael Snow, Kenneth Anger, Anna Karina, Hollis Frampton, Yvonne Rainer, Carolee Schneemann, et. al.

In the late 1960s, the New York art world was, famously, an exhilarating place to be. New forms, including performance and video art, were making their debuts, and sculpture was developing in startling ways. In the midst of it all, experimental abstract painting was pressing art’s most iconic medium to its limits and beyond. <I>High Times, Hard Times</I> fills a gap in coverage of this moment in history, recapturing its liveliness and urgency with more than 42 key pieces by 38 artists who were living and working in New York at the time. Many of those featured artists have contributed personal statements reflecting on the work, its meaning and the social scene that surrounded it, including Lynda Benglis, Mel Bochner, Roy Colmer, Mary Corse, David Diao and Peter Young, Guy Goodwin, Harmony Hammond, Mary Heilmann, Cesar Paternosto, Howardena Pindell, Dorothea Rockburne, Carolee Schneemann, Alan Shields, Joan Snyder, Franz Erhard Walther and Jack Whitten, as well as one curator and one critic, Marcia Tucker and Robert Pincus-Witten. The critic Katy Siegel and the painter David Reed have written essays tha focus, respectively, on the work’s explosive artistic and political context, and the experience of being a young painter living in New York during these years. Additional pieces by Dawoud Bey and Anna Chave focus on race and gender in that milieu. Color illustrations of every featured work, along with supplementary historic photographs from the period, ephemera, biographies, a timeline and a bibliography round out a beautiful, much-needed book, a complete reference on a crucial era.

For several years now, film and video have determined contemporary art and exhibitions on a scale unheard of since the 1960s and 1970s, but rarely have these roots themselves been explored. X-Screen presents a comprehensive historical analysis of expanded forms of filmic projection, arranging a complex constellation of films, performances, and installations according to three categories. First is an exploration of the expansion of the field of projection, understood as part of Happenings, as well as Fluxus and Pop performances. Work by Robert Whitman, Carolee Schneemann, and USCO is discussed. Second is an interrogation of the screen in terms of media analysis, anti-illusionism, or institutional critique in the context of Structural Film and Conceptual art. Film installations and multiple projections are especially relevant here, including work by Valie Export, Michael Snow, and Peter Weibel. And third is a consideration of post-minimalist explorations of the relationship between the media image and physical space, as seen in the work of Dan Graham, Bruce Nauman, Dennis Oppenheim, and others. Essays by Eric de Bruyn, Pamela Lee, Brandon Joseph, Liz Kotz, and Matthias Michalka.

A Japanese power plant, dilapidated slums, the patterned facades of an apartment complex in Paris–in the work of German art photographer Andreas Gursky, born in 1955 in Leipzig, both private dwellings and the domains of industrial and political power are made into sometimes awe-inspiring and always overpowering forces of urban life. Gursky’s signature mix of epic sweep and extreme detail is ideally suited to the portrayal of large-scale architecture, eliciting its most salient features: The capacity to dwarf, to impress, to alienate and to daunt. Where many of us will habitually blank out architectural environments which cannot be accommodated by the naked eye, Gursky’s approach is to photograph them in order to render them comprehensible: “My preference for clear structures is the result of my desire, perhaps illusory, to keep track of things and maintain my grip on the world.” Architectureis a collection of breathtaking images by the world-famous photographer, taken between 1988 and the present day, and treating all aspects of architectural structure, from the inside out. Each of the 75 color photographs is accompanied by commentary by renowned German authors Aleida Assmann, Jan Assmann, Elisabeth Bronfen, Sonja Fessel, Paul Nizon, Alfred Nordmann, Mirjam Schaub, Rudolf Schmitz, Monika Schmitz-Emans, Peter Schneemann and Thomas Zaunschirm. The resulting conjunction of text and image attractively demonstrates the depth and breadth of Gursky’s concept of architecture.

In recent years the use of film and video by British artists has come to widespread public attention. Jeremy Deller, Douglas Gordon, Steve McQueen and Gillian Wearing all won the Turner Prize (in 2004, 1996, 1999 and 1997, respectively) for work made on video. This fin-de-sicle explosion of activity represents the culmination of a long history of work by less well-known artists and experimental filmmakers. Ever since the invention of film in the 1890s, artists have been attracted to the possibilities of working with moving images, whether in pursuit of visual poetry, the exploration of the art form’s technical challenges, the hope of political impact, or the desire to reinvigorate such time-honored subjects as portraiture and landscape. Their work represents an alternative history to that of commercial cinema in Britain–a tradition that has been only intermittently written about until now. This major new book is the first comprehensive history of artists’ film and video in Britain. Structured in two parts (‘Institutions’ and ‘Artists and Movements’) , it considers the work of some 300 artists, including Kenneth Macpherson, Basil Wright, Len Lye, Humphrey Jennings, Margaret Tait, Jeff Keen, Carolee Schneemann, Yoko Ono, Malcolm Le Grice, Peter Gidal, William Raban, Chris Welsby, David Hall, Tamara Krikorian, Sally Potter, Guy Sherwin, Lis Rhodes, Derek Jarman, David Larcher, Steve Dwoskin, James Scott, Peter Wollen and Laura Mulvey, Peter Greenaway, Patrick Keiller, John Smith, Andrew Stones, Jaki Irvine, Tracy Emin, Dryden Goodwin, and Stephanie Smith and Ed Stewart. Written by the leading authority in the field, A History of Artists’ Film and Video in Britain, 1897-2004 brings to light the range and diversity of British artists’ work in these mediums as well as the artist-run organizations that have supported the art form’s development. In so doing it greatly enlarges the scope of any understanding of ” British cinema” and demonstrates the crucial importance of the moving image to British art history.

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