Catalogue de la premiére exposition rétrospective du sculpteur américain Donald Judd (1928-1994). Son oeuvre s’est distinguée dans les annÈes 1960. Il devint alors une figure majeur du “minimalisme”, terme qu’il rejetait néanmoins.

Barnett Newman (1905–1970), one of the greatest artists of the twentieth century, has captivated critics, scholars, and the general public for decades. This highly anticipated catalogue raisonné presents Newman’s entire oeuvre—paintings, drawings, sculpture, graphics, an architectural model, lost and unfinished works, and ephemera—in one stunning and definitive volume. Featured elements include color reproductions of unparalleled quality; extensive provenance, exhibition, and publication histories; and a listing of the contents of the artist’s library at the time of his death. In addition to the catalogue raisonné prepared by Heidi Colsman-Freyberger, the book offers revelatory essays on the artist, his career, and his working methods and features fascinating photographs of Newman, his studios, and his installations. Richard Shiff draws on new documentation to explain why Newman chose to create abstract art, how he achieved “fullness” in his paintings, and how his works exemplify the social functions of an artist. Carol C. Mancusi-Ungaro reveals extraordinary details about Newman’s studio practice and materials and techniques, information not available to the public before because Newman only allowed his wife to observe him at work. Mancusi-Ungaro also discusses the fate of works that were damaged while traveling to exhibitions or by vandals.

Barnett Newman (1905-1970) was one of the most profound and influential artists of the twentieth century. A master of expansive spatial effects and evocative color, he pioneered painting that was both abstract and emotive, suffused with powerful philosophical and spiritual meaning. This landmark book surveys the breadth of Newman’s career from his founding role in the New York School in the 1940s to his key influence on both minimalism and conceptual art in the 1960s. Featuring more than 100 of his paintings, drawings, prints, and sculptures, the book also offers significant new scholarly findings based on the archives of the Barnett Newman Foundation. Despite the apparent simplicity of his signature, the “zip,” Newman’s art is richly complicated and unexpectedly diverse. His works include such masterpieces as Onement 1 (1948), the series Stations of the Cross (1958-66), and the monumental sculpture Broken Obelisk (1967). Each work of art in this book is reproduced in full color and accompanied by its own entry. A comprehensive chronology of the artist’s life based on new documentation, a selected bibliography, and a selected exhibition history complete the volume.

Over the years, Donald Judd’s constructions have evolved, becoming increasingly complex in their optical and coloristic effects, making use of Cor-ten steel, Douglas fir plywood, colored plexiglass, painted steel, and various forms of aluminum. This catalogue elegantly displays work made between 1988 and 1994, the year he died.
Essay by Richard Shiff.

Robert Mangold’s (b.1937) gently curving, majestic paintings are among the most beautiful abstract works of the late twentieth century. Emerging in the 1960s, Mangold is often associated with Minimalism for his non-hierarchical compositions and use of simple geometric forms. His subtle colours and soft, hand-drawn figures also recall other sources, from traditional Greek pottery to the frescos of Piero. Among the most accomplished painters working today, Mangold is collected in the world’s pre-eminent museums. This first comprehensive monograph assesses Mangold’s contribution to contemporary painting, with essays by some of the most distinguished writers on contemporary art. Richard Shiff interprets Mangold’s art in the context of its broad cultural history; Robert Storr analyses the work in relation to late twentieth-century painting; Arthur C Danto examines in depth the Zone Paintings series; and Nancy Princenthal presents a chronological history of the concepts in the work. Also included is a conversation with the artist’s wife, painter Sylvia Plimack Mangold, about the sources behind his work, and artist’s statements accompanied by photographs of the artist in his studio by their son, the noted film maker James Mangold.

Barnett Newman’s writings reveal him to be an impassioned and articulate analyst of art and society who never hesitated to make his views known and always stood by them. To understand Newman’s unique place in the culture of the twentieth century, we must know both his paintings and his words–a knowledge made possible by this long-awaited volume. “Barnett Newman [1905-1970] was a thinker who chose to develop his ideas both in painting and in writing. He was also a citizen who made his acts of painting and writing political. And he was an artist.”–Richard Schiff, from the Introduction Barnett Newman’s writings reveal him to be an impassioned and articulate analyst of art and society who never hesitated to make his views known and always stood by them. To understand Newman’s unique place in the culture of the twentieth century, we must know both his paintings and his words–a knowledge made possible by this long-awaited volume.

This monograph is published on the occasion of Dan Flavin: Series and Progressions, the first exhibition of the artists work at David Zwirner since the gallery announced its representation of the Estate of Dan Flavin. This publication will examine Flavins use of progressions and serial structures, ideas that were central to the artists practice throughout his career. Flavin has been credited (by Mel Bochner) with being one of the first artists to make use of a basically progressional procedure, and the systematic arrangement of colour and light was an aspect of his work that not only led to it being characterized as Minimal art but which moreover influenced Conceptual artistic practices. The catalogue will feature a selection of exemplary work by the artist, ranging in date from 1963 to 1990. The first major monograph on Flavins work since the 2004 exhibition catalogue published on the occasion of the artists travelling retrospective (organized in 2004 by the Dia Art Foundation in association with the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and the Estate of Dan Flavin), Dan Flavin: Series and Progressions will include over 50 full-colour plates, in addition to a comprehensive selection of installation views and archival photographs and documents. Also included will be newly-commissioned texts on the artists work by noted Flavin scholar Tiffany Bell (who authored the artists catalogue raisonnÈ), and by art historians Anne Rorimer and Richard Shiff, and an interview with Dan Graham. Additionally, a detailed illustrated chronology will document exhibitions of Flavins work, covering the years 20042010. Co-published with David Zwirner, New York.

Presenting unique and in-depth collaborations and editions with leading international artists, Parkett No. 60 features Chuck Close, Diana Thater, and Luc Tuymans, three artists from very different backgrounds whose works have all moved towards painting’s basic elements of light and dark. Contributing writers include Francine Prose and Richard Shiff on Close; Sara Arrhenius, Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe and Regina Hasslinger on Thater; and Laura Hoptman, Gerardo Mosquera and Hans Rudolf Reust on Tuymans. This issue also contains essays on David Bunn, Jeremy Deller, and Paul Etienne Lincoln, as well as a conversation between Chuck Close and Elizabeth Peyton and an interview with Close by Bice Curiger.

In her expressionistic drawings and paintings of the last three decades, acclaimed South African artist Marlene Dumas has focused on the human figure, probing themes of love, desire, despair and confusion in order to slyly critique social and political attitudes toward women, children, people of color and others who have historically been victimized. From her evocative portraits, based on photographs of friends and family as well as figures culled from printed pornography, to her large-scale images highlighting charged relationships within groups, Dumas’ work explores the contradictions behind the physical reality of the body, merging acute social commentary with personal experience and art-historical antecedent to create unsettling and ambiguous psychological statements.
Accompanying Dumas’ first major mid-career survey in the U.S., with stops in three major American cities, (one yet to be announced) this substantial, fully-illustrated publication features a newly commissioned essay by renowned scholar Richard Shiff, placing the artist’s work in relation to both American figurative painting since the 1980s and Abstract Expressionism. The book also includes curator Cornelia H. Butler’s examination of Dumas’ photographic sources and shorter texts by Lisa Gabrielle Mark and Matthew Monahan. Writings by the artist, as well as an extensive illustrated exhibition history and bibliography, complete this comprehensive examination of the work of one of the most thought-provoking artists working today.
Born in Capetown, South Africa, in 1953, Marlene Dumas has lived in Amsterdam since 1976. Over the last three decades she has had numerous solo exhibitions throughout Europe and the U.S., including the Tate Gallery, London; the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; and the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris. In 1995 she represented The Netherlands at the 46th Venice Biennale.

Peter Doig’s highly distinctive paintings have been exhibited in major museums and galleries worldwide to international acclaim. Developed from film stills, footage of actual events or photographs of urban and rural environments, Doig’s paintings emanate a quiet nostalgia, triggering the lingering sense of a long forgotten memory. His work often deals with subjects at the fringes of normality, peripheral or marginal sites, unnamed places where the urban and natural worlds collide. Doig is known for his innovative exploration of the formal and thematic possibilities of landscape. In each work, he seeks to create an atmosphere that will draw the viewer into an intense and sometimes disorienting perceptual experience. His rigorous approach to surface, texture and color puts him among the most inventive painters of his generation–leaving a profound influence on young artists and contemporaries alike. Published to accompany Doig’s major European traveling retrospective originating at Tate Britain, this extremely satisfying and lavishly illustrated book provides a comprehensive account of the artist’s practice over two decades of extraordinary achievement. It is the most thorough overview of his work to date. With an essay by art historian Richard Shiff, an introduction by Tate curator Judith Nesbitt and an illuminating conversation between Doig and his friend, the artist Chris Ofili, this is an enlightening survey of one of the most influential painters at work today. Born in Edinburgh in 1959, Peter Doig was raised in Canada and spent two decades in London before moving to Trinidad, where he now lives and works. Doig graduated from St. Martins School of Art in 1983 and the Chelsea School of Art in 1990. He was nominated for the Turner Prize in 1994, and was included in the 2006 Whitney Biennial.

In the autumn of 2006, The Museum of Modern Art will present Brice Marden: A Retrospective, the artist’s first major American retrospective. The exhibition, which will travel to San Francisco and Berlin, will constitute an unprecedented gathering of Marden’s work, with more than 50 paintings and an equal number of drawings, balanced across the artist’s career. The accompanying catalogue is the first book to take readers through the full course of Marden’s work as it has developed over more than 40 years from the early 1960s to the present, showing his gradual, deliberate evolution, along with his constant exploration of light, color and surface at every turn. Marden’s first 20 years of work, characterized by the luminous monochrome panels for which he won his first acclaim, will for the first time appear alongside the celebrated production of the past 20 years, which followed a shift in the mid-1980s to calligraphic gestures in shimmering grounds, and another shift in the past decade to heightened color. Two of Marden’s newest paintings appear here for the first time. Gary Garrels interprets Marden’s work and places it in historical context. Carol C. Mancusi-Ungaro, of the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art at Harvard, examines issues of materials, processes and conservation. Richard Shiff, Brenda Richardson and Michael Duffy explore Marden’s early use of a grid and his engagement with time and space in the studio, as well as his observation of the elemental qualities of nature, his representational links to nature, and the distinctive emotional effects of the abstract monochrome works for which he was initially recognized. Marden himself addresses his working methods in an interview, and a comprehensive chronology, exhibition history and bibliography close the book out.

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