American independent filmmaker Stan VanDerBeek (1927-1984) was one of the first to extend film projection into multimedia spectacle and to embrace video and computer technology: a supreme instance of what critic Gene Youngblood dubbed “Expanded Cinema.”

Second Assembling Compiled by Richard Kostelanetz, Henry Korn, and Mike Metz Assembling: A cooperative annual magazine of the unpublished and the unpublishable – selected and printed by the contributors. Contributors were invited to submit 1000 copies of up to four 8.5 x 11 in. pages of anything they wanted to include, printed at their own expense on any paper by any means…” – from introduction. Contains projects by Tom Ahern, Ken Friedman, Jochen Gerz, Davi Det Hompson, Bern Porter, Alan Sondheim, Stan Vanderbeek and many others.

It was at Black Mountain College that Merce Cunningham formed his dance company, John Cage staged his first “happening,” and Buckminster Fuller built his first dome. Although it lasted only twenty-four years (1933-1957) and enrolled fewer than 1,200 students, Black Mountain College launched a remarkable number of the artists who spearheaded the avant-garde in America of the 1960s. The faculty included such diverse talents as Anni and Josef Albers, Eric Bentley, Ilya Bolotowsky, Robert Creeley, Willem de Kooning, Robert Duncan, Lyonel Feininger, Paul Goodman, Walter Gropius, Franz Kline, Robert Motherwell, and Charles Olson. Among the students were Ruth Asawa, John Chamberlain, Francine du Plessix Gray, Kenneth Noland, Arthur Penn, Robert Rauschenberg, Kenneth Snelson, Cy Twombly, Stan Vanderbeek, and Jose Yglesias.In this definitive account of the arts at Black Mountain College, back in print after many years, Mary Emma Harris describes a unique educational experiment and the artists and writers who conducted it. She replaces the myth of the college as a haphazardly conceived venture with a portrait of a consciously directed liberal arts school that grew out of the progressive education movement. Proceeding chronologically through the four major periods of the college’s history, Harris covers every aspect of its extraordinary curriculum in the visual, literary, and performing arts.

This is the first publication to explore the role of mirrors, spinning, and “neurotic” architecture – a feeling of psychological breakdown – in the work of one of America’s most important contemporary artists, Paul McCarthy (b. 1945). The book is published in conjunction with a major exhibition at the Whitney, for which McCarthy is creating two new installations to appear alongside his Bang Bang Room (1992) and two recently rediscovered film loops (1966, 1971).Each work involves a room structure that the viewer can step into and experience, often becoming disoriented as either the floor or entire structure spins, or as walls fold inward and outward. By comparing McCarthy’s use of rotational movement and visual effects to that of other artists of the 1960s and ’70s, the author seeks a new understanding of this bold innovator. An interview with McCarthy himself offers an unprecedented discussion of the influences on his art, including experimental filmmakers Stan Brakhage, Stan Vanderbeek, and Bruce Conner. The book not only raises new points but also recovers information and images from films once lost.

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