The towns and cities that we inhabit are the survivors of a much larger world that was never built–of visions of the future that remain on paper due to lack of funds, political changes, or because they were technically ahead of their time. How might the world look today had the realities of history been different? And how close will the architecture of the future be to that already familiar from science fiction films and the fantastic virtual environments of computer games? Fantasy Architecture proposes answers to these questions by focusing on 130 imagined buildings, structures, and schemes from the late medieval period to the present. Artists and architects include Robert Adam, Archigram, Charles Barry, Etienne-Louis Boullee, William Chambers, FAT, Foreign Office Architects, Foster and Partners, Erna Goldfinger, Louis Hellman, Inigo Jones, Berthold Lubetkin, Edwin Lutyens, Eric Mendelsohn, Nils Norman, Claes Oldenburg, Joseph Paxton, Sir John Soane, Softroom and Paolo Soleri. Essayists include Neil Bingham, previously Assistant Curator of the Royal Institute of British Architecture (RIBA) Drawings Collections, London and author of monographs on Christopher Nicholson and C.A. Busby; Clare Carolin, Exhibitions Curator at the Hayward Gallery in London; Rob Wilson, Curator at the RIBA Gallery; and architect Peter Cook, professor at the Bartlett School of Architecture and former member of the group Archigram, who offers a personal text.

edited by Eva Wilson, Daniela Zymantexts by Walead Beshty, Ramsay Burt, Ifat Finkelman, Martina Leeker, Steve Paxton, Howard Singerman, Noémie Solomon, Eva Wilson, Daniela ZymanThe catalog Sharon Lockhart | Noa Eshkol accompanies the eponymous exhibition at TBA21 – Augarten in Vienna by Sharon Lockhart (November 23, 2012-February 24, 2013) which consists of a complex installation of videos, photographs, and archival material, composing a subtle and sensuous portrait of the Israeli choreographer, dancer, researcher, and textile artist Noa Eshkol (1924-2007). The book features nine essays, installation photographs of the works on show, film stills, archival material from the Noa Eshkol Foundation (notations, journals, notes), and wall carpets by Noa Eshkol. Softcover176 pages

Catalogue for exhibition at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Paris, France, November 22, 1989 – February 18, 1990. Preface by Suzanne Pagé. Essays by Claude Gintz, Benjamin H.D. Buchloh, Charles Harrison, Gabriele Guercio and Seth Siegelaub. Includes bibliography. Illustrated in black-and-white. First edition includes text, in English, by Joseph Kosuth in response to Buchloh’s essay printed on sticker and affixed to page 54. Artists include: Art & Language, Michael Asher, John Baldessari, Robert Barry, Mel Bochner, Alighiero E Boetti, Marcel Broodthaers, Stanley Brouwn, Daniel Buren, Victor Burgin, Andre Cadere, Hanne Darboven, Jan Dibbets, Marcel Duchamp, Dan Flavin, Dan Graham, Hans Haacke, Eva Hesse, Douglas Huebler, Jasper Johns, On Kawara, Yves Klein, Joseph Kosuth, Sol LeWitt, Piero Manzoni, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Roman Opalka, Adrian Piper, Robert Rauschenberg, Edward Ruscha, Robert Smithson, Bernar Venet, Lawrence Weiner, Ian Wilson, Art & Project. Texts in English and French

If Looks Could Kill features an extensive line-up of new and exciting essays on fashion and crime in cinema. From stolen pearls to a glove left at the scene of the crime, from an excess of red lipstick to the postmodern gangster silhouette, this publicaton explores the compelling links between cinema, fashion, crime and violence. Tackling themes such as disguise, the expression of desire, juvenile delinquency and the corruption of beauty, the catalogue features a string of underworld characters and their prosecutors whose highly effective costume, styling and sartorial gestures helped define cinematic genres from detective to thriller, gangster, film noir and horror.

Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971 examines the beginnings of Ono’s career, demonstrating her pioneering role in visual art, performance and music during the 1960s and early 1970s. It begins in New York in December 1960, where Ono initiated a performance series with La Monte Young in her Chambers Street loft. Over the course of the decade, Ono earned international recognition, staging “Cut Piece” in Kyoto and Tokyo in 1964, exhibiting at the Indica Gallery in London in 1966, and launching with John Lennon her global “War Is Over!” campaign in 1969. Ono returned to New York in the early 1970s and organized an unsanctioned “one woman show” at MoMA. Over 40 years after Ono’s unofficial MoMA debut, the Museum presents its first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the artist’s work. The accompanying publication features three newly commissioned essays that evaluate the cultural context of Ono’s early years, and five sections reflecting her geographic locations during this period and the corresponding evolution of her artistic practice. Each chapter includes an introduction by a guest scholar, artwork descriptions, primary documents culled from newspapers, magazines and journals, and a selection by the artist of her texts and drawings.
Born in Tokyo in 1933, Yoko Ono moved to New York in the mid-1950s and became a critical link between the American and Japanese avant-gardes. Ono’s groundbreaking work greatly influenced the international development of Conceptual art, performance art and experimental film and music. In celebration of Ono’s eightieth birthday in 2013, the Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt organized a major traveling retrospective.

Institutional critique is an artistic practice that reflects critically on its own housing in galleries and museums and on the concept and social function of art itself. Such concerns have always been a part of modern art but took on new urgency at the end of the 1960s, when–driven by the social upheaval of the time and enabled by the tools and techniques of conceptual art–institutional critique emerged as a genre. This anthology traces the development of institutional critique as an artistic concern from the 1960s to the present by gathering writings and representative art projects of artists from across Europe and throughout the Americas who developed and extended the genre. The texts and artworks included are notable for the range of perspectives and positions they reflect and for their influence in pushing the boundaries of what is meant by institutional critique. Like Alberro and Stimson’s Conceptual Art: A Critical Anthology this volume will shed new light on its subject through its critical and historical framing. Even readers already familiar with institutional critique will come away from this book with a greater and often redirected understanding of its significance.Artists represented include Wieslaw Borowski, Daniel Buren, Marcel Broodthaers, Groupe de Recherche d’Art Visuel, Hans Haacke, Robert Smithson, John Knight, Graciela Carnevale, Osvaldo Mateo Boglione, Guerilla Art Action Group, Art Workers’ Coalition, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Michael Asher, Mel Ramsden, Adrian Piper, The Guerrilla Girls, Laibach, Silvia Kolbowski, Andrea Fraser, Fred Wilson, Mark Dion, Maria Eichhorn, Critical Art Ensemble, Bureau d’Études, WochenKlausur, The Yes Men, Hito Steyerl, Andreas Siekmann

Reprototypes, Triangulations and Road Tests brings together seven seminal works by Simon Starling and Superflex in a dialogical setting—among them Exposition (2004), Three Birds, Seven Stories, Interpolation and Bifurcations (2007–08), D1 – Z1 (22,686,575:1) (2009), Black Out (2009), and Kuh (2012). These works “collapse” as unstable complexes around pertinent themes whose triangulated speculations are articulated by undisciplined objects, piercing through the layers of time and history and revisiting long-held certainties. Posited as reprototypes, they reveal various strategies for siting the contemporary within the modern, resuscitating objects and innovations out of obsolescence, testing their contemporary vitality and thus disrupting the self-sufficiency of the modernist canon. Accompanying the exhibition at the newly inaugurated Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary exhibition space at Augarten, the publication includes contributions from philosopher Robin Mackay, architectural historians Esther da Costa Meyer and Venugopal Maddipati, media and cultural historian Birgit Schneider, the exhibition curators Eva Wilson and Daniela Zyman, and philosopher Mirjam Schaub.

This volume was developed in collaboration with founders of important and exemplary artist-run spaces of the 1960s-1970s. It represents the first extensive research on this subject and introduces spaces such as Art Metropole in Toronto, Artpool in Budapest, Ecart in Geneva, Franklin Furnace in New York, MOCA in San Francisco, La Mamelle in San Francisco, Printed Matter in New York, Western Front in Vancouver, and Zona in Florence, whose founders include Carl Andre, John Armleder, AA Bronson, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Tom Marioni, and Maurizio Nannucci. At a time of transition to new aesthetic approaches, these artists promoted community spirit and organizational skills, pioneering a revaluation of traditional art concepts. The book documents not only the activities of these spaces, but also maps the artistic strategies and positions that took currency during this period. It thus shows how the inner life of collective self-organization and the exchange between like-minded artist-run spaces developed dynamically. With contributions by Julie Ault, Fern Bayer, Lionel Bovier, AA Bronson, Christophe Cherix, Gabriele Dettere, Terry Fox, Peggy Gale, Julia Klaniczay, Lucy Lippard, Carl Loeffler, Tom Marioni, Maurizio Nannucci, Toni Sant, Darlene Tong, Michael Turner, Keith Wallace and Martha Wilson. The book is part of the Documents series and is co-published with Zona Archives.

British art and architecture of the 1950s are little known but extraordinarily topical today. Of particular relevance are the activities of the Independent Group, a loosely structured organization whose members included artists Richard Hamilton, Eduardo Paolozzi, and Magda Cordell, photographer Nigel Henderson, critics Reyner Banham and Lawrence Alloway, and architects Alison and Peter Smithson, James Stirling, and Colin St. John Wilson, who sought the essence of the everyday through a sensitivity to the hardships and charm of life in the raw. As Found encounters the transdisciplinary relationship between the constructed environment as it is visually perceived and verbally expressed.

Institutional critique is an artistic practice that reflects critically on its own place within galleries and museums and on the concept and social function of art itself. Such concerns have always been a part of modern art but took on new urgency at the end of the 1960s, when—driven by the social upheaval of the time and enabled by the tools and techniques of conceptual art—institutional critique emerged as a genre. This anthology traces the development of institutional critique as an artistic concern from the 1960s to the present, gathering writings and representative art projects of artists who developed and extended the genre. The artists come from across Europe and throughout North America. The texts and artworks included are notable for the range of perspectives and positions they reflect, and for their influence in pushing the boundaries of what is meant by institutional critique. Like Alberro and Stimson’s Conceptual Art: A Critical Anthology, this volume will shed new light on its subject through its critical and historical framing. Even readers already familiar with institutional critique will come away from this book with a greater and often redirected understanding of its significance. Artists represented include: Wieslaw Borowski, Daniel Buren, Marcel Broodthaers, Groupe de Recherche d’Art Visuel, Hans Haacke, Robert Smithson, John Knight, Graciela Carnevale, Osvaldo Mateo Boglione, Guerilla Art Action Group, Art Workers’ Coalition, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Michael Asher, Mel Ramsden, Adrian Piper, The Guerrilla Girls, Laibach, Silvia Kolbowski, Andrea Fraser, Fred Wilson, Mark Dion, Maria Eichhorn, Critical Art Ensemble, Bureau d’Études, WochenKlausur, The Yes Men, Hito Steyerl, Andreas Siekmann

* Philip Johnson: 6 pages with 13 b/w illustrations of the Sheldon Art Gallery, a Benedictine Priory, a Pavilion for his New Canaan property and the Union Air Terminal Building at Idlewild * Louis Kahn: 20 pages with 14 b/w text illustrations and 15 b/w illustrations of the Goldberg House (Rydal, PN), the American Consulate (Luanda, Portugese Angola) and a Unitarian Church (Rochester, NY) * Eero Saarinen: 14 pages with 21 b/w illustrations of the World Health Organization Headquarters (Geneva, Switzerland), the Samuel F. B. Morse and Ezra Stiles Colleges, Yale University and the John Deere and Company Administration Center (Moline, IL) * John Johansen: Act and Behavior in Architecture * Paul Rudolph: 14 pages with 26 b/w illustrations of Yale University Married Student Housing, Yale University Art and Architectural School Building and Milam House (St. John’s County, Florida) * The Future of the Past by Sibyl Moholy-Nagy (includes work by Peter Behrens, Eero Saarinen, Mies van der Rohe, Philip Johnson, Paul Rudolph and Louis Kahn * Notes on American Architecture by James Gowan (includes work by Frank Lloyd Wright, Eero Saarinen, Twitchell and Rudolph, R. M. Schindler, Mies van der Rohe, Philip Johnson and Louis Kahn) * The Exploded Landscape by Walter McQuade (includes work by Paul Rudolph, Philip Johnson, Eero Saarinen, John Johansen and Louis Kahn) * Form-givers: Peter Collins * Open and Closed: Colin St. John Wilson (includes work by Theo van Doesburg, Walter Gropius, Hugo Haering, Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, Eero Saarinen and Louis Kahn

* Philip Johnson: 6 pages with 13 b/w illustrations of the Sheldon Art Gallery, a Benedictine Priory, a Pavilion for his New Canaan property and the Union Air Terminal Building at Idlewild * Louis Kahn: 20 pages with 14 b/w text illustrations and 15 b/w illustrations of the Goldberg House (Rydal, PN), the American Consulate (Luanda, Portugese Angola) and a Unitarian Church (Rochester, NY) * Eero Saarinen: 14 pages with 21 b/w illustrations of the World Health Organization Headquarters (Geneva, Switzerland), the Samuel F. B. Morse and Ezra Stiles Colleges, Yale University and the John Deere and Company Administration Center (Moline, IL) * John Johansen: Act and Behavior in Architecture * Paul Rudolph: 14 pages with 26 b/w illustrations of Yale University Married Student Housing, Yale University Art and Architectural School Building and Milam House (St. John’s County, Florida) * The Future of the Past by Sibyl Moholy-Nagy (includes work by Peter Behrens, Eero Saarinen, Mies van der Rohe, Philip Johnson, Paul Rudolph and Louis Kahn * Notes on American Architecture by James Gowan (includes work by Frank Lloyd Wright, Eero Saarinen, Twitchell and Rudolph, R. M. Schindler, Mies van der Rohe, Philip Johnson and Louis Kahn) * The Exploded Landscape by Walter McQuade (includes work by Paul Rudolph, Philip Johnson, Eero Saarinen, John Johansen and Louis Kahn) * Form-givers: Peter Collins * Open and Closed: Colin St. John Wilson (includes work by Theo van Doesburg, Walter Gropius, Hugo Haering, Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, Eero Saarinen and Louis Kahn

Vides. Une rétrospective est une exposition paradoxale : à travers la réactualisation de neuf ” expositions vides “, elle apparaît simultanément comme un projet expérimental qui refuse les règles classiques des arts visuels et comme un objet historique qui confronte les réalisations de Art & Language, Robert Barry, Stanley Brouwn, Maria EichRorn, Bethan Huws, Robert Irwin, Yves Klein, Roman Ondàk et Laurie Parsons. Support et prolongement de la manifestation, cet ouvrage dessine les contours du concept de ” vider dans l’art, l’esthétique, la philosophie, la religion, les sciences, la culture populaire, l’architecture et la musique, en abordant les problématiques du rien, de la vacuité, de l’invisible et de l’ineffable, du rejet et de la destruction. John Armleder Mathieu Copeland Laurent Le Bon Gustav Metzger Mai-Thu Perret Clive Phillpot Philippe Pirotte (s.l.d.r.). S’ouvrant sur un catalogue qui documente les neuf expositions historiques et contemporaines retenues, le livre comporte également une anthologie d’une quarantaine de textes, souvent inédits, ainsi que des contributions d’artistes spécialement réalisées pour l’ouvrage. Les essais de Benjàmin Buchloh, Jean-François Chevrier, Lucy Lippard, Bernard Marcadé; Anne Moeglin-Delcroix, Sadie Plant, Didier Semin ou Sarah Wilson s’entrecroisent ainsi avec des entretiens réalisés avec Robert Barry, Ben, Morgan Fisher, Claude Parent ou Jacques Villeglé, et les propositions de Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster, Hans Haacke, Malcolm McLaren, Olivier Mosset, Sturtevant ou Lawrence Weiner. À travers la riche documentation et les textes de spécialistes réunis, cet ensemble se propose d’évaluer les origines, les dispositifs et les résonances de ce geste artistique capital, consistant à vider l’espace d’exposition plutôt qu’à le remplir.

Institutional Critique and After explores the history and contemporary reassessment of the Institutional Critique movement launched in the late 1960s by artists including Michael Asher and Hans Haacke. One of the movement’s key aims was the exposure and ironization of the structures and logic of museums and art galleries. The movement was redeveloped in the 1980s and after by Andrea Fraser, Renée Green, Fred Wilson, and others who engaged in more interactive and performative interventions; and has been vigorously reoriented in recent years to address issues such as globalization. The publication will explore histories, theories, diverse locations and different kinds of institutional and alternative space. It will touch on traditional forms of art, but also on installations, performance, new media practices, and cultural activism. Its central questions will turn on the critical potential of art (and institutions) and whether—and if so how—they can stimulate social or political change. With texts by art historians, critics, curators, and artists such as John Searle, Hans Haacke, Alexander Alberro, Maria Eichhorn, Andrea Fraser, Isabelle Graw, Martin Sastre, Renée Green, Lynn Zelevansky, Monica Bonvicini, Christiane Paul, The Guerilla Girls, Juli Carson, Javier Téllez, Astrid Mania, Amy Pederson, The Yes Men, Lauri Firstenberg, Jens Hoffmann, Mike Kelley, and Ricardo Dominguez. Published with The Southern California Consortium of Art Schools (SoCCAS), as the second volume of a series of anthologies dedicated to contemporary art issues.

Site-specific art emerged in the late 1960s in reaction to the growing commodification of art and the prevailing ideals of art’s autonomy and universality. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, as site-specific art intersected with land art, process art, performance art, conceptual art, installation art, institutional critique, community-based art, and public art, its creators insisted on the inseparability of the work and its context. In recent years, however, the presumption of unrepeatability and immobility encapsulated in Richard Serra’s famous dictum “to remove the work is to destroy the work” is being challenged by new models of site specificity and changes in institutional and market forces. One Place after Another offers a critical history of site-specific art since the late 1960s and a theoretical framework for examining the rhetoric of aesthetic vanguardism and political progressivism associated with its many permutations. Informed by urban theory, postmodernist criticism in art and architecture, and debates concerning identity politics and the public sphere, the book addresses the siting of art as more than an artistic problem. It examines site specificity as a complex cipher of the unstable relationship between location and identity in the era of late capitalism. The book addresses the work of, among others, John Ahearn, Mark Dion, Andrea Fraser, Donald Judd, René¥ Green, Suzanne Lacy, Iñ©§¯ Manglano-Ovalle, Richard Serra, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, and Fred Wilson.

A new breed of contemporary artist engages science and technology—not just to adopt the vocabulary and gizmos, but to explore and comment on the content, agendas, and possibilities. Indeed, proposes Stephen Wilson, the role of the artist is not only to interpret and to spread scientific knowledge, but to be an active partner in determining the direction of research. Years ago, C. P. Snow wrote about the “two cultures” of science and the humanities; these developments may finally help to change the outlook of those who view science and technology as separate from the general culture. In this rich compendium, Wilson offers the first comprehensive survey of international artists who incorporate concepts and research from mathematics, the physical sciences, biology, kinetics, telecommunications, and experimental digital systems such as artificial intelligence and ubiquitous computing. In addition to visual documentation and statements by the artists, Wilson examines relevant art-theoretical writings and explores emerging scientific and technological research likely to be culturally significant in the future. He also provides lists of resources including organizations, publications, conferences, museums, research centers, and Web sites.

Controversy swirled around the Black Panthers from the moment the revolutionary black nationalist Party was founded in Oakland, California, in 1966. Since that time, the group that J. Edgar Hoover called “the single greatest threat to the nation’s internal security” has been celebrated and denigrated, deified and vilified. Rarely, though, has it received the sort of nuanced analysis offered in this rich interdisciplinary collection. Historians, along with scholars in the fields of political science, English, sociology, and criminal justice, examine the Panthers and their present-day legacy with regard to revolutionary violence, radical ideology, urban politics, popular culture, and the media. The essays consider the Panthers as distinctly American revolutionaries, as the products of specific local conditions, and as parts of other movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

One contributor evaluates the legal basis of the Panthers’ revolutionary struggle, explaining how they utilized and critiqued the language of the Constitution. Others explore the roles of individuals, looking at a one-time Panther imprisoned for a murder he did not commit and an FBI agent who monitored the activities of the Panthers’ Oakland branch. Contributors assess the Panthers’ relations with Students for a Democratic Society, the Young Lords, the Brown Berets, and the Peace and Freedom Party. They discuss the Party’s use of revolutionary aesthetics, and they show how the Panthers manipulated and were manipulated by the media. Illuminating some of the complexities involved in placing the Panthers in historical context, this collection demonstrates that the scholarly search for the Black Panthers has only just begun.

Contributors. Bridgette Baldwin, Davarian L. Baldwin, David Barber, Rod Bush, James T. Campbell, Tim Lake, Jama Lazerow, Edward P. Morgan, Jeffrey O. G. Ogbar, Roz Payne, Robert O. Self, Yohuru Williams, Joel Wilson

Catalogo della rassegna romana Video ’79, un evento che, a dieci anni dai primi esperimenti in videotape, vedeva una notevole quantità di opere in mostra (340 titoli di videoarte, documentario e controinformazione da tutto il mondo). Video ’79 nasceva dall’esigenza di mettere a confronto le esperienze e tentare un bilancio del decennio 1969-1979. Tra gli autori italiani presenti: Alighiero Boetti, Vito Acconci, Giuliano Scabia, Vana Caruso, Dodo Brothers, Giancarlo Cardini, Giuseppe Chiari, Fabio Garriba, Alberto Grifi, Videobase (Alfredo Leonardi, Anna Lajolo, Guido Lombardi); inoltre molti nomi internazionali, tra i piu noti: Nam June Paik, Twyla Tharp, Urs Luthi, Marina Abramovic, Gina Pane, Bob Wilson, Jean Luc Godard, Charlemagne Palestine, Todd Rundgren, Robert Ashley. Sommario: – Perchè Video ’79 – Alessandro Silj – Arte in/come televisione – Don Foresta – Fare video non è facile come sembra – Giuliano Scabia – La mancanza di una forma di video – Robert Kleyn – L’artista provinciale – Richard Kriesche – Ma in Jugoslavia il video esiste? – Sania Ivekovic-Dalibor Martinis – Enti locali e videotape – Giuseppe Richeri – Il delittuoso cammino verso la professione – Andrea Ruggeri – Dodo Bros. – Lettera aperta agli organizzatori di Video ’79 – Alberto Grifi – Conversazione con Martine Barrat (con Flavio Vida, Mimmo Lombezzi) – Community TV: un parere da Chinatown – Peter Chow – Uncontrolled data – Martha Stuart – Video sociologico – Fred Forest – Miti e realtà del videotape – John Howkins – elenco dei video in rassegna

* Philip Johnson: 6 pages with 13 b/w illustrations of the Sheldon Art Gallery, a Benedictine Priory, a Pavilion for his New Canaan property and the Union Air Terminal Building at Idlewild * Louis Kahn: 20 pages with 14 b/w text illustrations and 15 b/w illustrations of the Goldberg House (Rydal, PN), the American Consulate (Luanda, Portugese Angola) and a Unitarian Church (Rochester, NY) * Eero Saarinen: 14 pages with 21 b/w illustrations of the World Health Organization Headquarters (Geneva, Switzerland), the Samuel F. B. Morse and Ezra Stiles Colleges, Yale University and the John Deere and Company Administration Center (Moline, IL) * John Johansen: Act and Behavior in Architecture * Paul Rudolph: 14 pages with 26 b/w illustrations of Yale University Married Student Housing, Yale University Art and Architectural School Building and Milam House (St. John’s County, Florida) * The Future of the Past by Sibyl Moholy-Nagy (includes work by Peter Behrens, Eero Saarinen, Mies van der Rohe, Philip Johnson, Paul Rudolph and Louis Kahn * Notes on American Architecture by James Gowan (includes work by Frank Lloyd Wright, Eero Saarinen, Twitchell and Rudolph, R. M. Schindler, Mies van der Rohe, Philip Johnson and Louis Kahn) * The Exploded Landscape by Walter McQuade (includes work by Paul Rudolph, Philip Johnson, Eero Saarinen, John Johansen and Louis Kahn) * Form-givers: Peter Collins * Open and Closed: Colin St. John Wilson (includes work by Theo van Doesburg, Walter Gropius, Hugo Haering, Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, Eero Saarinen and Louis Kahn

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