The towns and cities that we inhabit are the survivors of a much larger world that was never built–of visions of the future that remain on paper due to lack of funds, political changes, or because they were technically ahead of their time. How might the world look today had the realities of history been different? And how close will the architecture of the future be to that already familiar from science fiction films and the fantastic virtual environments of computer games? Fantasy Architecture proposes answers to these questions by focusing on 130 imagined buildings, structures, and schemes from the late medieval period to the present. Artists and architects include Robert Adam, Archigram, Charles Barry, Etienne-Louis Boullee, William Chambers, FAT, Foreign Office Architects, Foster and Partners, Erna Goldfinger, Louis Hellman, Inigo Jones, Berthold Lubetkin, Edwin Lutyens, Eric Mendelsohn, Nils Norman, Claes Oldenburg, Joseph Paxton, Sir John Soane, Softroom and Paolo Soleri. Essayists include Neil Bingham, previously Assistant Curator of the Royal Institute of British Architecture (RIBA) Drawings Collections, London and author of monographs on Christopher Nicholson and C.A. Busby; Clare Carolin, Exhibitions Curator at the Hayward Gallery in London; Rob Wilson, Curator at the RIBA Gallery; and architect Peter Cook, professor at the Bartlett School of Architecture and former member of the group Archigram, who offers a personal text.

In Numbers is the first volume to address an overlooked art form that is neither artist’s book nor ephemera, but is entirely its own unique entity: the artist’s serial publication. Across such groundswell moments as the small press boom of the 1960s, the correspondence art movement of the early 1970s and the DIY zine culture of the 1980s and early 1990s, artists have seized on magazine and postcard formats as forms in themselves. These are not publications that print criticism, manifestos or reproductions of artworks; rather, they are themselves artworks, in large part factured by younger artists operating at the peripheries of mainstream art cultures, or by established artists looking for an alternative to the marketplace. Dating from 1955 to the present, In Numbers begins with Wallace Berman’s Semina and continues through Joe Brainard’s C Comics, Situationist Times, Eleanor Antin’s 100 Boots, File, Robert Heinecken’s modified periodicals, the Japanese group Provoke’s magazine, Ian Hamilton Finlay’s Poor.Old.Tired.Horse, Fluxus, Art-Language, Raymond Pettibon’s Tripping Corpse, Maurizio Cattelan’s Permanent Food and contemporary examples such as North Drive Press, LTTR and Continuous Project. (Approximately 60 publications in total are surveyed.) Documenting the history of each publication-its inception, production, distribution and impact-together with a fully illustrated bibliography for each title, In Numbers is embellished with essays by Clive Phillpot, Nancy Princenthal, William S. Wilson and Neville Wakefield. An illustrated conversation between Collier Schorr and Gil Blank provides an overview.

A visual essay of 19th and 20th century painting relating to the concept of portaling along with a piece of reportage concerning a writer named Eleanor Norwich. Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with show held jointly at Kent Fine Art and Curt Marcus Gallery, New York, November 17 – December 31, 1987. Curated by Douglas Blau, with essay by Blau. Includes works by Troy Brauntuch, Ralph Albert Blakelock, Thomas Moran, Charles Wilson Peale, Johannes Vermeer, William Merritt Chase, Randy Dudley, Chesley Bonestell, Norman Rockwell, John Bowman, Thornton Oakley, Caspar David Friedrich, James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Cindy Sherman, Hans W. Hannau, Stanford Gifford, William Cameron Menzies, Richard Bergh, Winslow Homer, Joseph M. Newman, Stanley Kubrick, Hugh Ferriss, Arnold Genthe, Mark Innerst, Eugene Medard, Eugene Chaperon, Joseph Wright of Derby, David Deutsch, Thomas Eakins, Charles West Cope, Charles Lewis Fusell, C.E. Swaye, Thomas Anshutz, George Pal, Virgil Mirano, Howard Hawkes, Jack Conway, Charles H. Stephens, Johann Zoffany, John Ferguson Weir, Walter Dorwin Teague, Thomas Cole, Jan Christiaensz, Jack Goldstein, Komar & Melamid, William L. Sonntag, Hubert Robert, Bonfils, Elihu Vedder, Edwin Dickinson, William Bradford, Jospeh Mallord, William Turner, Frederic Edwin Church, Michael Zwack, Arnold Böcklin, Alain Resnais, Karl Friedrich Schinkel, George Caleb Bingham, Thomas Wilmer Dewing, Joseph Hirsch, Fernand Khnopff, James Rosenquist, Giuseppe Pellizza Da Volpedo, Chuck Rogers, Angelo Morbelli, Gustave Caillebotte, Michele Zalopany, Edward Hopper, John Singer Sargent, and Rembrandt van Rijn.

“The lid’s off! Now, thanks to such publications as Kiss, Screw, and Pleasure, the common man is at last being informed about the latest beaver movies, nudie stage plays, dirty comics, etc. in four-letter language he can dig. William Teach has daringly documented – with excerpts, illustrations, and photographs – the ultra-candid, sex-oriented tabloids now being sold on street-corners and at the newsstands.” — from the back cover of the original Greenleaf Classics edition. Based primarily on the NYC sex tabloids of the title, this survey also includes underground comics (with work by R. Crumb, S. Clay Wilson, Spain Rodriguez, art by Kanarek etc.) and other phenomena of the sexual revolution, plus graphic sex photos. Overall the work is presented in cultural and historical contexts and offers useful information on sex tabloids.

Reference: In Numbers : Serial Publications by Artists Since 1955″ by Andrew Roth, Philip Aarons, Victor Brand, Clive Phillpot, Neville Wakefield, Nancy Princenthal, William S. Wilson. Zurich / New York, Switzerland / NY : JRP – Ringier / PPP Editions, 2008, pp. 413 and 417.

L’exposition « Vidéo Vintage », présentée au Centre Pompidou de février à mai 2012, retrace une trajectoire des débuts de l’art vidéo (1963-1983), à partir d’une sélection de bandes vidéo fondatrices de la collection du Centre Pompidou – l’une des plus importantes au monde. Elle reflète le foisonnement d’une vingtaine d’années de création contemporaine, à travers les œuvres pionnières d’artistes internationalement reconnus, parmi lesquels Marina Abramović, Samuel Beckett, Joseph Beuys, Daniel Buren,Valie Export, Mona Hatoum, Robert Filliou, Bruce Nauman, Nam June Paik, Bill Viola, William Wegman, Lawrence Weiner, Bob Wilson, entre autres.

Contains artists’ projects by artists and musicians including: Barbara Ess, J.M. Sherry, Nick Antonopolus, Robert Appleton, Andy Baird, Barbarians for Socialism, S. Battista, Coetow Birnbaum, Carol Black, M. Bock, Eric Gogosian, Cara Brownell, Glenn Branca, ellen Bruno, Nina Canal, The Coachmen, Michele Confredo, Mitch Corber, Peter Cummings, Dan, Demi, Margaret Dewys, Marcel Duchamp, Barbara Ess, Louis Feitler, Benny Ferdman, Mr. and Mrs. Frank, Bobby G., Henry Garfunkel, Michael Glier, Kim Gordon, Dan Graham, Christine Hahn, Steven Harvey, Kristen Hawthorne, Jenny Holzer, Becky Howland, Glenda Hydler, Todd Jorgensen, Peggy Katz, Jeff Koons, Barbara Kruger, Rona Kuscher, Joe Lewis, Carla Liss, Jeff Lohn, N.Y. Lost, Mark Marek, Peter Marra, Lucinda Marshall, Ray Matthews, Aline Mayer, Paul McMahon, Ann Mesner, Dick Miller, peter Moenig, Alan Moore, Gary Morgan, Mr. Mental, Matt Mullican, Charlie Nash, Joseph Nechvatal, Tom Tooerness, Bart Plantenga, Brian Piersol, Michael Warren Powel, ‘R’, Nancy Radloff, Howard Rodman, Christy Rupp, Thaddeus Rutkowski, Sammy, John Savas, Janet Schwartz, R.L. Seltma, J.M. Sherry, Ingrid Sischy, William Skrips, Smegma, Jim Sutcliffe, Taro Suzuki, Wharton Tiers, Lynne Tillman, Diane Torr, Douglas Turnbough, Gail Vachon, Peter Velez, Sally White, Martha Wilson, Robin Winters, Stephen Wischerth.

This insightful book is the first to present a comprehensive survey of the Modernist movement as it emerged in America between 1920 and 1960 in various graphic media. It identifies and examines great works in advertising, information design, identity, magazine design, print, dimensional design, and posters that by mid-century had defined American graphic design. R. Roger Remington begins by discussing the emergence of Modernism and its major historical influences, including European avant-garde art movements, technology, geopolitical issues, popular culture, educational innovations such as the Bauhaus, architecture, industrial design, and photography. The heart of the book brings together the key works of mid-century Modernism, presenting them chronologically from the 1930s to the 1950s. The final section shows the impact of and reactions to these Modernist influences as graphic design in America matured into the 1960s and beyond. Handsomely designed and illustrated, American Modernism is destined to become,a classic text in the study of design and visual culture. Contents Preface The Basis for the New: The Cradle of Modernism, 1850-1899 A New World Forming: The Impact of Modernism, 1900-1919 American Design in Transition: Traditional to Modernism, 1920-1929 Into the Design Scene: Modernism Arrives in America, 1930-1939 At War and After: The Creative Forties in America, 1940-1949 A New Style: American Design at Mid-Century, 1950-1959 Design Since Mid-Century: Diversity and Contradiction, 1960-1999 Notes Bibliography Picture credits Acknowledgements Contains work by Alvin Lustig, Alvar Aalto, Dr. Mehemed Fehmy Agha, Constantin Alajalov, Josef Albers, Alexander Archipenko, Merle Armitage, Frank Barr, Hans Barschel, Saul Bass, Bauhaus, Willy Baumeister, Herbert Bayer, Lester Beall, Max Beckmann, Norman Bel Geddes, Morris Benton, Henryk Berlewi, Lucian Bernhard, Joseph Binder, Ernst Bohm, Will Bradley, Georges Braque, Frances Brennan, Marcel Breuer, Alexey Brodovitch, Max Burchartz, Will Burtin, Jean Carlu, David Carson, Melbert Cary, A. M. Cassandre, Ernest Caulkins, Cherryburn Press, Arthur Cohen, Charles Coiner, Container Corporation of America, Cranbrook Academy of Art, Louis Danziger, Claude Debussy, Rudolph De Harak, Fortunato Depero, Donald Deskey, De Stijl, Deutscher Werkbund, Walter Dexel, Otto Dix, Cesar Domela, Henry Dreyfuss, William Addison (W. A.) Dwiggins, Charles Eames, Milton Feasley, Gene Federico, Max Fleischer, Fortune Magazine, Dan Friedman, Leon Friend, Robert Gage, Sigfried Giedion, George Giusti, Milton Glaser, William Golden, Morton Goldsholl, Frederick Goudy, April Greiman, Glenn Grohe, Walter Gropius, George Grosz, Edmund Guess, Jay Hambridge, Richard Edes Harrison, Baron Georges Eugene Hausmann, Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield, Hannah Hoch, Hans Hofmann, Gerald Holton, Clarence Hornung, Johannes Itten, Egbert Jacobsen, S. A. Jacobs, Robert Jensen, Philip Johnson, Bobby Jones, L. B. Jones, Wassily Kandinsky, Susan Kare, Edward McKnight Kauffer, Rockwell Kent, Gyorgy Kepes, Frederick Kiesler, Paul Klee, Knoll Furniture Company, Rudolph Koch, Willi Kunz, Le Corbusier, Fernand Leger, Alexander Liberman, Leo Lionni, El Lisstsky, George Lois, William Longhauser, Herb Lubalin, Katherine McCoy, Douglas McMurtrie, James Mangan, Man Ray, John Massey, Herbert Matter, Rollo May, Ludwig Meidner, R. Hunter Middleton, Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Otto Mueller, Otto Neurath, Olivetti, Maxfield Parrish, Art Paul, Paul Theobald & Company, Sir Joseph Paxton, Max Pechstein, Charles Pegay, John Pemberton, Edward Penfield, Pablo Picasso, Cipe Pineles, Giovanni Pintori, PM Magazine, Ezra Pound, Push Pin Studios, Paul Rand, Paul Renner, Frank Robinson, Bruce Rogers, Gilbert Rohde, Lester Rondell, George Salter, L. Sandusky, Paula Scher, Kurt Schwitters, Joseph Sinel, Mino Somenzi, Edward Steichen, Alex Steinweiss, Otto Storch, Paul Strand, Ladislav Sutnar, Walter Dorwin Teague, Bradbury Thompson, Karl Tiege, A. Tolmer, Jan Tschichold, Massimo Vignelli, Vogue Magazine, James Watt, Wolfgang Weingart, Westvaco, Wes Wilson, Henry Wolf, Frank Lloyd Wright, Piet Zwart, and others.

In “Why America Fights,” Susan A. Brewer, a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point, says wartime presidents chant political propaganda instinctively, as if leveling with the citizenry would rally dissent and gum the chances for conquest. In understated prose and meticulous detail — 595 end notes in six chapters — Brewer ably argues that the strategies of presidential persuasion for starting or remaining in wars are little more than watery stews of lies, bluffs and exaggerations or the perfuming of facts to scent the air with what Donald Rumsfeld called “perception management.” Brewer examines the narratives of six military efforts: the Philippine War, World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the Iraq war. Under a succession of presidents — McKinley, Wilson, Roosevelt, Truman, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon and Bush — American involvement was enshrined as humanitarian and the enemy demonized as barbaric. Whether the United States went to the Philippines to aid what William McKinley called our “little brown brothers,” or to Iraq for what Bush called “a divine mission,” or to extend Madeleine Albright’s credo that America is “the indispensable nation. We stand tall. We see further into the future than other countries,” Americans suffered few civilian casualties and saw other lands ravaged, not their own. With presidents trying to persuade — not educate — the public, Brewer writes, a “propaganda campaign seeks to disguise a paradoxical message: war is not a time for citizens to have an informed debate and make up their own minds even as they fight in the name of freedom to do just that.” Brewer’s scholarship on the manipulation of public opinion places her in the company of Noam Chomsky, James Loewen, Michael True, Howard Zinn and other historians or social analysts of skeptical bent. Like them, she scours the record to counter the historical amnesia of the public. She documents how presidents at war portrayed themselves as travelers on the high road to peace and justice, not the low road to battle and dystopia: “Throughout the twentieth century, American leaders presented war aims dedicated to the spread of democracy and freedom rather than the expansion of U.S. power.” Although, Brewer writes, “the United States repeatedly denied that it sought more territory, it steadily acquired naval and military bases. As of 2008, the United States had more than seven hundred bases in 132 countries. . . . Its priority was the maintenance of governments, whether democratic or not, that allowed the Americans economic and strategic access to their countries.” “Why America Fights” would be stronger had a chapter been devoted to the mainstream media, which so often act as dummies dandled on the knees of presidential ventriloquists mouthing propaganda. While Brewer touches on the collective complicity in spots — the Pentagon’s Office of Media Outreach and its “Operation Truth” campaign to bring pliant talk show hosts to Iraq, the Committee on Public Information that sold reporters on Woodrow Wilson’s “war to end war” policies — her analysis lacks the depth found in Norman Solomon’s 2005 book, “War Made Easy: How Presidents and Pundits Keep Spinning Us to Death” or William Blum’s 2003 “Killing Hope: U.S. Military and CIA Interventions Since World War II.” Brewer’s interpretation of presidential propaganda is likely to be dismissed by keepers of the temple’s secrets as a baleful outburst by a lefty professor hawking her ideological assumptions. That might be plausible, except that “Why America Fights” soars well above the usual marks of bias: carelessness, rants or conclusions not connected to facts. Brewer’s work is one with George Orwell’s line in “Homage to Catalonia”: “One of the most horrible features of war is that the war-propaganda, all the screaming and lies and hatred, comes invariably from people who are not fighting.” It also gives credibility to Martin Luther King Jr.’s April 4, 1967, comment: “The greatest purveyor of violence in the world today [is] my own government.” The accuracy of that judgment, heightened, not lessened, by the passing of time, might be better relished if more historians were as questioning as Susan Brewer.

Controversy swirled around the Black Panthers from the moment the revolutionary black nationalist Party was founded in Oakland, California, in 1966. Since that time, the group that J. Edgar Hoover called “the single greatest threat to the nation’s internal security” has been celebrated and denigrated, deified and vilified. Rarely, though, has it received the sort of nuanced analysis offered in this rich interdisciplinary collection. Historians, along with scholars in the fields of political science, English, sociology, and criminal justice, examine the Panthers and their present-day legacy with regard to revolutionary violence, radical ideology, urban politics, popular culture, and the media. The essays consider the Panthers as distinctly American revolutionaries, as the products of specific local conditions, and as parts of other movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

One contributor evaluates the legal basis of the Panthers’ revolutionary struggle, explaining how they utilized and critiqued the language of the Constitution. Others explore the roles of individuals, looking at a one-time Panther imprisoned for a murder he did not commit and an FBI agent who monitored the activities of the Panthers’ Oakland branch. Contributors assess the Panthers’ relations with Students for a Democratic Society, the Young Lords, the Brown Berets, and the Peace and Freedom Party. They discuss the Party’s use of revolutionary aesthetics, and they show how the Panthers manipulated and were manipulated by the media. Illuminating some of the complexities involved in placing the Panthers in historical context, this collection demonstrates that the scholarly search for the Black Panthers has only just begun.

Contributors. Bridgette Baldwin, Davarian L. Baldwin, David Barber, Rod Bush, James T. Campbell, Tim Lake, Jama Lazerow, Edward P. Morgan, Jeffrey O. G. Ogbar, Roz Payne, Robert O. Self, Yohuru Williams, Joel Wilson

Contains artists’ projects by artists and musicians including: Barbara Ess, J.M. Sherry, Nick Antonopolus, Robert Appleton, Andy Baird, Barbarians for Socialism, S. Battista, Coetow Birnbaum, Carol Black, M. Bock, Eric Gogosian, Cara Brownell, Glenn Branca, ellen Bruno, Nina Canal, The Coachmen, Michele Confredo, Mitch Corber, Peter Cummings, Dan, Demi, Margaret Dewys, Marcel Duchamp, Barbara Ess, Louis Feitler, Benny Ferdman, Mr. and Mrs. Frank, Bobby G., Henry Garfunkel, Michael Glier, Kim Gordon, Dan Graham, Christine Hahn, Steven Harvey, Kristen Hawthorne, Jenny Holzer, Becky Howland, Glenda Hydler, Todd Jorgensen, Peggy Katz, Jeff Koons, Barbara Kruger, Rona Kuscher, Joe Lewis, Carla Liss, Jeff Lohn, N.Y. Lost, Mark Marek, Peter Marra, Lucinda Marshall, Ray Matthews, Aline Mayer, Paul McMahon, Ann Mesner, Dick Miller, peter Moenig, Alan Moore, Gary Morgan, Mr. Mental, Matt Mullican, Charlie Nash, Joseph Nechvatal, Tom Tooerness, Bart Plantenga, Brian Piersol, Michael Warren Powel, ‘R’, Nancy Radloff, Howard Rodman, Christy Rupp, Thaddeus Rutkowski, Sammy, John Savas, Janet Schwartz, R.L. Seltma, J.M. Sherry, Ingrid Sischy, William Skrips, Smegma, Jim Sutcliffe, Taro Suzuki, Wharton Tiers, Lynne Tillman, Diane Torr, Douglas Turnbough, Gail Vachon, Peter Velez, Sally White, Martha Wilson, Robin Winters, Stephen Wischerth.

Included artists: Adams Alice, Agostini Peter, Andre Carl, Antonakos Stephen, Arneson Robert, Artschwager Richard, Bochner Mel, Bollinger Bill, Bourgeois Louise, Brown Marvin, Calder Alexander, Celmins Vija, Chamberlain John, Chase-Riboud Barbara, Chryssa, Corse Mary, De Andrea John, De Rivera Jose, Di Suvero Mark, Duff John, Edwards Melvin, Eversley Frederick John, Ferrara Jackie, Ferrer Rafael, Flavin Dan, Frank Mary, Friedberg Richard, Gilhooley David, Graham Robert, Graves Nancy, Grieger Scott, Haber Ira Joel, Hanson Duane, Hubbard Robert, Hudson Robert, Hunt Richard, James Laurace, Johnson Daniel La Rue, Judd Danald, Kipp Lyman, Kohn Gabriel, Larson Haydn, Lerner Marilyn, Le Va Barry, Levinson Mon, Linder Jean, Lipton Seymour, Lobe Robert, McCracken John, Melchert James, Miss Mary, Moore G.E., Morris Robert, Morton Ree, Murray Robert, Myers Forrest, Nauman Bruce, Neri Manuel, Noguchi Isamu, Noland Kenneth, Oldenburg Claes, Oppenheim Dennis, Ossorio Alfonso, Price Kenneth, Reginato Peter, Rickey George, Roche Jim, Rockburne Dorothea, Rohm Robert, Ruppersberg Allen, Saar Bettye, Samaras Lucas, Scanga Italo, Segal george, Serra Richard, Shapiro Joel, Shaw Richard, Shostak Ed, Smith George, Smith Tony, Smithson Robert, Snelson Kenneth, Sonnier Keith, Steiner Michael, Stone Sylvia, Strider Marjorie, Sugarman George, Tetherow Michael, Todd Mike, Truitt Anne, Valentine DeWain, Van Buren Richard, Van Fleet Ellen, Voulkos Peter, Westermann H.C., Wiley William T., Wilmarth Christopher, Wilson May, Winsor Jackie

This is a provocative chronicle of the guerilla art movement that changed comics and popular culture forever. This comprehensive book follows the movements of about 50 artists from 1963 to 1975, the heyday of the underground comix movement. Through interviews with the participants and other materials, Rebel Visions is the most intimate look ever at the people and events that forged the phenomenon known as underground comix, from New York to San Francisco, from the corn belt to deep in the heart of Texas, beginning that day in 1968 when R. Crumb debuted Zap #1 from a baby carriage in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district. Rosenkranz spent over 30 years researching this book and acquiring the cooperation of every significant underground cartoonist who worked throughout this period, including Crumb, Gilbert (Fabulous Furry Freak Brothers) Shelton, Bill (Zippy) Griffith, Art (Maus) Spiegelman, Jack Jackson, S. Clay Wilson, Robert Williams, and many more. The book is illustrated with many never-before-seen drawings by all of the underground cartoonists and exclusive photographs.

The book is centered in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district, where Crumb and the rest of his Zap cronies commingled with the rest of the city’s countercultural scene, notably musicians like the Grateful Dead and Janis Joplin. The counterculture was omnipresent in San Francisco for those few years, with underground tabloids like Yellow Dog and the San Francisco Oracle steering the zeitgeist out-of-control, along with the music, political, and psychedelic drug scenes, all of which found a group of unlikely revolutionaries who drew cartoons right at the epicenter. This is the definitive book on a memorable and historic era.

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