Michael Asher (born in 1943), one of the foremost installation artists of the Conceptual art period, is a founder of site-specific practice. Considered a progenitor of institutional critique, he spearheaded the creation of artworks imbued with a self-conscious awareness of their dependence on the conditions of their exhibition context.

In the work Kunsthalle Bern 1992, Asher removed the radiators from all the museum’s exhibition spaces and reassembled them in its entryway gallery. Metal pipes connected the relocated radiators to their original sockets; these tubular conduits, coursing in linear fashion along the Kunsthalle’s walls, kept the steam heat flowing and endowed the installation with directional lines of force. This “displacement of givens” offers a perfect example of site-specific practice, one that took the gallery space and the institution itself as its subject. In this detailed examination of Kunsthalle Bern 1992, Anne Rorimer considers the work in the context of Asher’s ongoing desire to fuse art with the material, economic, and social conditions of institutional presentation. Rorimer analyzes Kunsthalle Bern 1992 in relation to the earlier innovations of such minimalist artists as Donald Judd, Carl Andre, Robert Morris, Sol LeWitt, Bruce Nauman, and Dan Flavin as well as to such conceptualist contemporaries as Daniel Buren, Dan Graham, and Maria Nordman. She also considers the installation in the context of other works by Asher that have used non-art, functional elements, including walls, or that have investigated museological issues.

Rampollo di una delle famiglie più in vista della Vienna fin-de-siècle, ingegnere aeronautico, volontario nella prima guerra mondiale, maestro di scuola elementare, giardiniere in un monastero, architetto, professore a Cambridge… genio. Quante vite si nascondono dietro lo sguardo leggermente beffardo con cui Ludwig Wittgenstein ci osserva dalla copertina di questo libro? Michael Nedo – che a Wittgenstein ha dedicato la propria esistenza di studioso – ha raccolto foto, lettere, citazioni, taccuini, appunti, memorie di parenti e amici del filosofo austriaco, nel tentativo di rispondere a questa domanda e di rivelare la complessa interazione tra la vita e l’opera, l’ambiente culturale e quello familiare di una delle figure più originali ed enigmatiche del Novecento.

This issue of Studio International contains a 48-page “exhibition” organized by Seth Siegelaub: “The content of the 48-page exhibition in this issue was organized by requesting six critics to each edit an 8-page section of the magazine, and in turn, to make available their section to the artist(s) that interest them. The Table of Contents lists the name of the artist(s) under the name of the critic who was responsible for their participation.” — Seth Siegelaub. Section curated by David Antin: Dan Graham, Harold Cohen, John Baldessari, Richard Serra, Eleanor Antin, Fred Lonidier, George Nicolaidis, Keith Sonnier; curated by Germano Celant: Giovanni Anselmo, Alighiero Boetti, Pier Paolo Calzolari, Mario Merz, Giuseppe Penono, Emilio Prini, Pistoletto, Gilberto Zorio; curated by Michel Claura: Daniel Buren; curated by Charles Harrison: Keith Arnatt, Terry Atkinson, David Bainbridge, Michael Baldwin, Harold Hurrell, Victor Burgin, Barry Flanagan, Joseph Kosuth, John Latham, Reolof Louw; curated by Lucy R. Lippard: Robert Barry, Stephen Kaltenbach, Lawrence Weiner, On Kawara, Sol LeWitt, Douglas Huebler, N.E. Thing Co., Frederick Barthelme; curated by Hans Strelow: Jan Dibbets, and Hanne Darboven.

Catalogue for exhibition at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Paris, France, November 22, 1989 – February 18, 1990. Preface by Suzanne Pagé. Essays by Claude Gintz, Benjamin H.D. Buchloh, Charles Harrison, Gabriele Guercio and Seth Siegelaub. Includes bibliography. Illustrated in black-and-white. First edition includes text, in English, by Joseph Kosuth in response to Buchloh’s essay printed on sticker and affixed to page 54. Artists include: Art & Language, Michael Asher, John Baldessari, Robert Barry, Mel Bochner, Alighiero E Boetti, Marcel Broodthaers, Stanley Brouwn, Daniel Buren, Victor Burgin, Andre Cadere, Hanne Darboven, Jan Dibbets, Marcel Duchamp, Dan Flavin, Dan Graham, Hans Haacke, Eva Hesse, Douglas Huebler, Jasper Johns, On Kawara, Yves Klein, Joseph Kosuth, Sol LeWitt, Piero Manzoni, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Roman Opalka, Adrian Piper, Robert Rauschenberg, Edward Ruscha, Robert Smithson, Bernar Venet, Lawrence Weiner, Ian Wilson, Art & Project. Texts in English and French

Photographic book containing essay by Gregoire Müller discussing the new avant-garde art of the seventies. Lively photographic essays for each artist by Gianfranco Gorgoni. Includes: Dan Flavin, Sol LeWitt, Carl Andre, Robert Morris, Robert Smithson, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier, Bruce Nauman, Joseph Beuys, Mario Merz, Walter De Maria, and Michael Heizer.

Radical pedagogy from Bauhaus to Black Mountain: a defining document of ’60s counterculture
Maurice R. Stein and Larry Miller’s Blueprint for Counter Education is one of the defining (but neglected) works of radical pedagogy of the Vietnam War era. Originally published as a boxed set by Doubleday in 1970, the book was accompanied by large graphic posters that could serve as a portable learning environment for a new process-based model of education, and a bibliography and checklist that map patterns and relationships between radical thought and artistic practices―from the modernist avant-gardes to postmodernism, from the Bauhaus to Black Mountain College, from Theodor Adorno and Walter Benjamin to Buckminster Fuller and Norman O. Brown―with Herbert Marcuse and Marshall McLuhan serving as points of anchorage. Blueprint for Counter Education thus serves as a vital synthesis of the numerous intellectual currents in the countercultural debate on the radical reform of schools, universities and ways of learning. To accompany this new facsimile edition of the book and posters, an 80-page booklet features a conversation with the original Blueprint creators, Maurice R. Stein, Larry Miller and designer Marshall Henrichs, as well as essays from Jeffrey Schnapp, Paul Cronin and notes on the design by Adam Michaels of Project Projects.
Marshall Henrichs is a painter as well as a graphic designer; he studied with Richard Lindner, Walter Murch, George McNeil and Fredrico Castellon at the Pratt Institute. After graduation, he worked for several major New York publishers including Doubleday, where he served as art director. Among his editorial projects were various mainstream projects but also counterculture outliers such as Blueprint for Counter Education and Ira Einhorn’s 78–187880 (Doubleday, 1972).
Larry Miller, sociologist, was a member of the editorial collectives of the New American Movement newspaper and the journal Socialist Revolution/Socialist Review. He has written about major theorists and writers such as Marx, Gramsci, Althusser and Machiavelli.
Maurice R. Stein is an American sociologist and innovator in higher education. Stein is co-recipient of the 1987 Robert and Helen Lynd Lifetime Achievement Award bestowed by the American Sociological Association’s Community and Urban Sociology Section. Retired from Brandeis University since 2002, Stein resides in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Paul Cronin is the editor of On Film-Making: An Introduction to the Craft of the Director (2004), a collection of writings by British director Alexander Mackendrick; Werner Herzog’s A Guide for the Perplexed (2014), an interview book with the German director; and Lessons with Kiarostami (2014), based on workshops conducted by Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami. His films include “Look out Haskell, it’s real!” The Making of Medium Cool (2001; re-edited 2013), Film as a Subversive Art: Amos Vogel and Cinema 16 (2003), In the Beginning was the Image: Conversations with Peter Whitehead (2006) and A Time to Stir (forthcoming, 2017), a 15-hour historical documentary about the student protests at Columbia University in 1968.
Adam Michaels is the cofounder of New York–based design studio Project Projects and the founder of Inventory Press. His work focuses on the active synthesis of typography and images―as well as editorial and design work―as a means of conveying significant content to diverse audiences. Project Projects works on books, exhibitions, identity systems and websites with clients such as the Canadian Centre for Architecture, MoMA, SALT Istanbul and Steven Holl Architects, and has been chosen twice as a finalist for the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Awards. The studio’s work has been widely published, and its principals have lectured and taught both nationally and internationally. The third and most recent title in the Inventory Books series is The Electric Information Age Book: McLuhan/Agel/Fiore and the Experimental Paperback, by Jeffrey T. Schnapp and Adam Michaels, which was further elaborated upon as a full-length vinyl LP entitled The Electric Information Age Album.
Before moving to Harvard in 2011, Jeffrey T. Schnapp occupied the Pierotti Chair of Italian at Stanford University, where he founded the Stanford Humanities Lab in 1999. A cultural historian, designer and curator, he is the author of over 20 books and hundreds of essays. His most recent books are The Electric Information Age Book (Princeton Architectural Press, 2012); Modernitalia (Peter Lang, 2012); and Digital_Humanities (MIT Press, 2012), coauthored with Anne Burdick, Johanna Drucker, Peter Lunenfeld and Todd Presner. The Library beyond the Book, coauthored with Matthew Battles, was published by Harvard University Press in 2014. Schnapp is professor of romance literatures at Harvard, where he also teaches in the Department of Architecture at the Graduate School of Design, in addition to directing metaLAB and codirecting the Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

PROPORTIO features specially commissioned artworks by contemporary artists, 20th century masterpieces, Old Master paintings, archaeological artefacts, as well as architectural models and a large library of historical books on proportions. All these works provide a lens to help us see what proportion can teach us about the essential design of the present and how we can use this knowledge to create a blueprint for the future. This exhibition is an opportunity to explore universal proportions and an invitation to reflect upon the interconnectedness of our universe. Proportio includes newly commissioned installations by contemporary artists such as Marina Abramovíc, Anish Kapoor, Massimo Bartolini, Rei Naito, Michaël Borremans, Ettore Spaletti, along with existing masterpieces by Ellsworth Kelly, Carl André and Sol Lewitt, as well as antiquities, Old Masters and antique architectural models.

Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with show held at the Galerie Näscht St. Stephan, Wien, Austria, March 15 – April 10, 1971. Essays by Peter Weiermair and Ricky Comi. With statements by Joseph Kosuth and Sol LeWitt. Artists include Shushuku Arakawa, Arts Agency, John Baldessari, Mel Bochner, Daniel Buren, Luciano Fabro, Gilbert & George, Hans Haacke, Michael Heizer, Douglas Huebler, Mario Merz, N.E. Thing Co., Dennis Oppenheim, Richard Serra, Robert Smithson, and Lawrence Weiner, among others. Printed in black-and-white. Text in German.

In the tradition of John Berger’s Ways of Seeing, Michael Rock, principal and founder of 2×4 Design in New York, explores the history and development of twenty-first-century visual and design culture. This book presents a thoughtful and witty exploration of graphic design today produced by Michael Rock of 2×4, the powerhouse creative firm that partners with some of the most design-savvy brands and institutions in the world to develop design systems that draw on both modernist traditions and the exuberance of contemporary life. Set forth in an engaging and humorous way, Multiple Signatures examines all aspects of modern design, from typography to the evolution of screens in advertising to trusting one’s own creative instincts, through a series of smart and often irreverent essays and images. Using 2×4’s own collaborations and projects as examples, and drawing on the experience of the contributing authors, the result is not a clinical textbook, but a fantastic and thought-provoking work about the limitless applications of design. A must-have for design students and professionals, Multiple Signatures challenges standard ways of understanding design and inspires readers to think of graphic design as a building block for all creative disciplines.

This volume was developed in collaboration with founders of important and exemplary artist-run spaces of the 1960s-1970s. It represents the first extensive research on this subject and introduces spaces such as Art Metropole in Toronto, Artpool in Budapest, Ecart in Geneva, Franklin Furnace in New York, MOCA in San Francisco, La Mamelle in San Francisco, Printed Matter in New York, Western Front in Vancouver, and Zona in Florence, whose founders include Carl Andre, John Armleder, AA Bronson, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Tom Marioni, and Maurizio Nannucci. At a time of transition to new aesthetic approaches, these artists promoted community spirit and organizational skills, pioneering a revaluation of traditional art concepts. The book documents not only the activities of these spaces, but also maps the artistic strategies and positions that took currency during this period. It thus shows how the inner life of collective self-organization and the exchange between like-minded artist-run spaces developed dynamically. With contributions by Julie Ault, Fern Bayer, Lionel Bovier, AA Bronson, Christophe Cherix, Gabriele Dettere, Terry Fox, Peggy Gale, Julia Klaniczay, Lucy Lippard, Carl Loeffler, Tom Marioni, Maurizio Nannucci, Toni Sant, Darlene Tong, Michael Turner, Keith Wallace and Martha Wilson. The book is part of the Documents series and is co-published with Zona Archives.

Exhibition catalogue published in conjunction with show held at the Allen Art Museum, Oberlin College, Ohio, April 17 – May 12, 1970. Introduction by Athena T. Spear. Artists include Vito Acconci, Siah Armajani, Michael Asher, John Baldessari, Robert Barry, Frederick Barthelme, Bill Beckley, Mel Bochner, Jonathan Borofsky, George Brecht, Victor Burgin, Donald Burgy, Ian Burn, Scott Burton, James Lee Byars, Luis Camnitzer, Rosemarie Castoro, Don Celender, Fred Cornell Cone, Christpher Cook, Eduardo Costa, Robert Cumming, Roger Cutforth, Royce Dendler, David Dunlap, David Eisler, Robert Feke, Rafael Ferrer, George Gladstone, Dan Graham, Ira Joel Haber, Richards Jarden, On Kawara, Michael Kirby, Paul Kos, Joseph Kosuth, R. Rexinger Lau, Barry Le Va, Les Levine, Gleen Lewis, Sol LeWitt, Martin Maloney, Bruce McLean, Bruce Nauman, N.E. Thing Co., Ltd., Claes Oldenburg, Saul Ostrow, Paul Pechter, John Perreault, Adrian Piper, Mel Ramsden, Glen Rea, Allen Ruppersberg, Thomas Duncan Shannon, Society for Theoretical Art and Analyses, Marjorie Strider, John Van Saun, Bernar Venet, Jeffrey Wall, William Wegman, Hannah Weiner, Lawrence Weiner, and David Nelson. Includes a range of documents, from drawings and sketches to writing and project proposals and outlines. In black-and-white.

A collection of artists’ books by: Marina Abramovic, Carl Andre, Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, Robert Morris, Ida Applebroog, Armando, Sophie Taeuber-Arp, Jean Arp, Richard Artschwager, Enrico Baj, Guido Ballo, John Baldessari, Miroslaw Balka,Balthus, Georg Baselitz, Marius Bauer, Merina Beekman, Joseph Beuys, Marcel Broodthaers, David Bunn, Chris Burden, Eduardo Chillida, Catherine Claeyé, Francesco Clemente, Chuck Close, Jean Cocteau, George Hugnet, Bruce Conner, Michael Craig-Martin, Olafur Eliasson, Max Ernst, Yves Tanguy, Tristan Tzara, Anya Gallaccio, Ryan Gander, Alberto Giacometti, Gilbert & George, Pim van Halem, Jonathan Hammer, Sjoerd Hofstra, John Billingham, Jörg Immendorf, Xu Pei, Rein Jansma, Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly, Paul Klee, Jannis Kounellis, Barbara Kruger, Stephen King, André Lanskoy, Henri Laurens, Richard Long, Kasper Andreasen, Tine Melzer, Christien Meindertsma, Sophie Calle , Constant Nieuwenhuys / Gerrit Kouwenaar, Guiseppe Penone, Sigmar Polke, Ken Price / Charles Bukowski, Robert Rauschenberg, David Sandlin, Koosje Schmeddes, Sean Scully, Kiki Smith, Nicolas de Staël, Antoni Tàpies, Andrea Tippel, Richard Tuttle, Damian van der Velden, herman de vries, Hans Waanders, Kara Walker, Alicja Werbachowska, Christopher Wool, Raymond Pettibon, Paul Éluard, Marino Marini, Alicia Martin, Paul McCarthy, Jason Roades, Jack Milroy, René Char, Henry Moore, Robert Motherwell, Octavio Paz, Roman Ondak, Henk Peeters, Edward Ruscha, Man Ray, Louise Bourgeois, Sonia Delaunay, Wassily Kandinsky, Ellsworth Kelly, Joan Miró, Fernand Leger, Sol LeWitt, Henry Matisse, A.R. Penck, Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol and Lawrence Weiner.

How did a small art college in Nova Scotia become the epicenter of art education–and to a large extent of the postmimimalist and conceptual art world itself–in the 1960s and 1970s? Like the unorthodox experiments and rich human resources that made Black Mountain College an improbable center of art a generation earlier, the activities and artists at Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (aka NSCAD) in the 1970s redefined the means and methods of art education and the shape of art far beyond Halifax.

A partial list of visiting artists and faculty members at NSCAD would include Joseph Beuys, Sol LeWitt, Gerhard Richter, Dan Graham, Mel Bochner, Lucy Lippard, John Baldessari, Hans Haacke, Yvonne Rainer, Robert Frank, Jenny Holzer, Robert Morris, Eric Fischl, and Dara Birnbaum. Kasper Koenig and Benjamin Buchloh ran the NSCAD Press, publishing books by Hollis Frampton, Lawrence Weiner, Donald Judd, Daniel Buren, Michael Asher, Martha Rosler, and Michael Snow, among others. The Lithography Workshop produced early works by many of today’s masters, including John Baldessari, Vito Acconci, and Claes Oldenburg. With The Last Art College, Garry Kennedy, the college’s visionary president at the time, gives us the long-awaited documentary history of NSCAD during a formative era. From gallery openings to dance performances to visiting lectures to exhibitions to classroom projects, the book gives a rich historical and visual account of the school’s activities, supplemented by details of specific events, reminiscences by faculty and students, accounts of artists’ talks, and notes on memorable controversies.

Indice ( un capitolo per ogni artista, 6/9 tavole per ogni artista / a chapter for every artist, 6/9 plates for every artist) / Index: Walter De Maria / Bruce Nauman / Dennis Oppenheim / Mario Merz / Robert Morris / Piero Manzoni / Cristo / Vito Acconci / Michael Heizer / Joseph Kosuth / Gilbert & George / Sol Lewitt / Richard Long / Jannis Kounellis / Francesco Lo Savio / Dan Flavin / Agnes Martin / Bernd & Hilla Becher / Robert Ryman / Giulio Paolini / Daniel Buren / Richard Tuttle / On Kawara / Carl Andre / Joseph Beuys / Donald Judd

By the end of the 1960s a revolution had taken place in the perception and practice of art in Europe and North America. This book, the first detailed account of developments centered around the conceptual art movement, highlights the main issues underlying visually disparate works dating from the second half of the 1960s to the end of the 1970s. These works questioned the accepted categories of painting and sculpture by embracing a wealth of alternative media and procedures. Traditional two- and three-dimensional representations were supplanted by a variety of linguistic and photographic means, as well as installations that brought into play the importance of presentation and site. Through close examination of individual works and artists, Anne Rorimer demonstrates the pervading desire to redefine the characteristics of what was once accepted as truly visual in order to dispel earlier assumptions and offer other criteria for seeing. Artists whose work is discussed in depth include Robert Ryman, Gerhard Richter, Joseph Kosuth, Lawrence Weiner, Eleanor Antin, John Baldessari, Gilbert & George, Sol LeWitt, Adrian Piper, Bruce Nauman, Vito Acconci, Marcel Broodthaers, Robert Smithson, Daniel Buren, and Michael Asher. Forerunners of the period such as Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Andy Warhol, Frank Stella, Piero Manzoni, Joseph Beuys, Allan Kaprow, and Fluxus are also included.

Compared to other avant-garde movements that emerged in the 1960s, conceptual art has received relatively little serious attention by art historians and critics of the past twenty-five years—in part because of the difficult, intellectual nature of the art. This lack of attention is particularly striking given the tremendous influence of conceptual art on the art of the last fifteen years, on critical discussion surrounding postmodernism, and on the use of theory by artists, curators, critics, and historians. This landmark anthology collects for the first time the key historical documents that helped give definition and purpose to the movement. It also contains more recent memoirs by participants, as well as critical histories of the period by some of today’s leading artists and art historians. Many of the essays and artists’ statements have been translated into English specifically for this volume. A good portion of the exchange between artists, critics, and theorists took place in difficult-to-find limited-edition catalogs, small journals, and private correspondence. These influential documents are gathered here for the first time, along with a number of previously unpublished essays and interviews. Contributors: Alexander Alberro, Art & Language, Terry Atkinson, Michael Baldwin, Robert Barry, Gregory Battcock, Mel Bochner, Sigmund Bode, Georges Boudaille, Marcel Broodthaers, Benjamin Buchloh, Daniel Buren, Victor Burgin, Ian Burn, Jack Burnham, Luis Camnitzer, John Chandler, Sarah Charlesworth, Michel Claura, Jean Clay, Michael Corris, Eduardo Costa, Thomas Crow, Hanne Darboven, RaAl Escari, Piero Gilardi, Dan Graham, Maria Teresa Gramuglio, Hans Haacke, Charles Harrison, Roberto Jacoby, Mary Kelly, Joseph Kosuth, Max Kozloff, Christine Kozlov, Sol LeWitt, Lucy Lippard, Lee Lozano, Kynaston McShine, Cildo Meireles, Catherine Millet, Olivier Mosset, John Murphy, HAlio Oiticica, Michel Parmentier, Adrian Piper, Yvonne Rainer, Mari Carmen Ramirez, Nicolas Rosa, Harold Rosenberg, Martha Rosler, Allan Sekula, Jeanne Siegel, Seth Siegelaub, Terry Smith, Robert Smithson, Athena Tacha Spear, Blake Stimson, Niele Toroni, Mierle Ukeles, Jeff Wall, Rolf Wedewer, Ian Wilson.

Multiples by: John L. Tancock, Abe Ajay, Otmar Alt, Arman, Jean Arp, Richard Artschwager,Enrico Baj, Mary Bauermeister, Miguel Berrocal, Joseph Beuys, Max Bill, Mel Bochner, Sandro Bocola, Hartmut Bohm, Agostino Bonalumi, Victor Bonato,Davide Boriani, Derek Boshier, Martha Boto, David Bradshaw, K.P. Brehmer,Marcel Broodthaers, Robert Bryant, Ursula Burghardt, Pol Bury, John Cage,Alexander Calder, Malcolm Carder, Enrico Castellani, Alik Cavaliere, Mario Ceroli, Thomas Chimes, Christo, Chryssa, Genevieve Claisse, Gianni Colombo,Kenelm Cox, Carlos Cruz-Diez, Bill Culbert, Allan D’Arcangelo, Sandro de Alexandris, Lucio Del Pezzo, H.R. Demarco, Walter De Maria, Jim Dine, Herbert Distel, Francesco Marino di Teana, Piero Dorazio, Angel Duarte, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, Michel Fadt, Rafael Ferrer, Robert Filliou, Lucio Fontana,Horacio Garcia-Rossi, Karl Gerstner, Gilbert & George, Ludwig Gosewitz, Hans Haacke, Raymond Hains, Etienne Hajdu, Richard Hamilton, Maurice Henry,Eva Hesse, Charles Hinman, Karl Horst Dodicke, Douglas Huebler, Fritz Hendertwasser, Jean Ipousteguy, Allen Jones, Howard Jones, Donald Judd,Iwao Kagoshima, Stephen Kaltenbach, Pierre Keller, Milan Knizak, Piotr Kowalski, David Lamelas, Fernand Leger, Julio Le Parc, Sol LeWitt, Roy Lichtenstein, Shoji Lida, Liliane Lijn, Richard Lindner, Yuan-Chia Li, Bernard Luginbuhl, Adolf Luther, Rene Magritte, Piero Manzoni, Enzo Mari, Marisol,Gino Marotta, Henri Matisse, Paul Matisse, Rory McEwen, Tomio Miki, Marcello Morandini, Francois Morellet, Robert Morris, Bruno Munari, Bruce Nauman,Louise Nevelson, Kazuo Okazaki, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, George Ortman, Claus Paeffgen, Palermo, Pavlos, Henry Pearson, David Pelham, Alicia Penalba, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Sigmar Polke, Arnaldo Pomodoro, Gio Pomodoro, William Pye, Edival Ramosa, Robert Rauschenberg, May Ray, Martial Raysse, Paul Reich, George Rickey, Larry Rivers, James Rosenquist, Dieter Rot [Dieter Roth], Mimmo Rotella, Gerhard Rühm, Edward Ruscha, Lucas Samaras,Remo Saraceni, Pedroni Sarenco, Alan Saret, Nicholas Schoffer, Peter Sedgley,George Segal, Richard Serra, Richard Smith, Tony Smith, Robert Smithson,Kenneth Snelson, Francisco Sobrino, Keith Sonnier, Jesus Raphael Soto, Daniel Spoerri, Klaus Staeck, Klaus Staudt, Joel Stein, Saul Steinberg, Kumi Sugai,George Sugarman, Takis, Paul Palman, Takao Tanabe, Andre Thomkins, Joe Tilson, Jean Tinguely, Luis Tomasello, David Tremlett, Ernest Trova, Michael Tyzack, Raoul Ubac, Gunther Uecker, De Wain Valentine, Gregorio Vardanega,Victor Vasarely, Wolf Vostell, Andy Warhol, Willy Weber, Lawrence Weiner,Gunter Wesler, Ludwig Wilding, Jean Pierre Yvaral

Spanning from Minimalism to Land Art, this selection of the most important drawings from the Marzona Collection at the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin features key American and European works, as well as all sorts of related studies and ephemera. Artists: Vito Acconci, Carl Andre, Giovanni Anselmo, Stephen Antonakos, Art & Language, David Askevold, Robert Barry, Ronald Bladen, Mel Bochner, Bill Bollinger, Stanley Brouwn, James Lee Byars, Jacques Charlier, Hanne Darboven, Walter de Maria, Jan Dibbets, Peter Downsbrough, Hamish Fulton, Gilbert & George, Michael Heizer, Douglas Huebler, On Kawara, Joseph Kosuth, Iannis Kounellis, Gary Kuehn, Barry Le Va, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Gordon Matta-Clark, Mario Merz, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Dennis Oppenheim, Blinky Palermo, Giulio Paolini, Anne and Patrick Poirier, David Rabinowitch, Mel Ramsden, Ulrich Rückriem, Edward Ruscha, Reiner Ruthenbeck, Fred Sandback, Gerry Schum, Robert Smithson, Lawrence Weiner,

Suzaan Boettger offers the first comprehensive history of the Earthworks movement in the United States, providing a fascinating and in-depth analysis of the monumental forms that initiated the broader genre of Land Art. Examining the art, the artists, their dealers and proponents, Boettger interprets Earthworks as a manifestation both of artists’ personal stories and of the late 1960s social and political tumult.
Boettger overturns many commonly held notions of Earthworks’ origins and intentions. She argues that Robert Smithson’s work on the Dallas-Fort Worth airport stimulated his thinking and that his writing about it catalyzed the movement. The visionary environments that followed, often sculpted in expansive and remote western terrains, were idealized by Americans and Europeans alike as displays of cowboy bravado. Boettger identifies earthworkers Michael Heizer, Dennis Oppenheim, Robert Morris, Walter de Maria, and Stephen Kaltenbach as former Californians whose treatment of the landscape reflects a western spirit. Her international purview integrates early work by the Europeans Barry Flanagan, Jan Dibbets, Richard Long, and Pino Pascali as precedents and parallels. Her examination of Earthworks’ relationship to the ecology movement perceptively corrects a popular misconception about the artists’ goals while acknowledging the social and cultural complexities of the period.
Insightful discussions of Carl Andre, Sol LeWitt, and Claes Oldenburg–in addition to the artists mentioned above–are accompanied by many rare and new photographs of both the art and its creators. Witty, accessible, and scrupulously researched, Earthworks constructs day-to-day chronologies of the development of the artistic movement and its intersections with the larger public events of the time, including specific accounts of galleries, exhibitions, and criticism. Boettger’s dynamic social history and psychological insights bring new meaning to this pivotal movement that both embodied and disrupted contemporary notions of art, nature, society, and their relationship to each other.

Richard Long is widely recognized as one of the most important artists to have emerged since the 1960s, along with contemporaries Robert Smithson, Robert Morris and Sol LeWitt. This book gathers together for the first time a selection of Long’s statements and interviews from 1971 through 2006. Published alongside black-and-white reproductions of his works, many of the texts have been unavailable for years. Also included are an early interview from 1971, published for the first time in English, and a previously unpublished conversation with Michael Auping, Chief Curator of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. These seminal texts are invaluable for an understanding of the rich and complex implications of Long’s work. Taken together, they form the best introduction available to the work of one of the most important artists working today.

Between 1969 and 1974, the influential curator Lucy Lippard (born 1937) curated four decisive Conceptual art exhibitions, and in doing so reinvented the exhibition catalogue. 4,492,040 is a facsimile reprint of the extremely scarce and hugely important catalogues produced for those exhibitions: 557,087 (the Seattle Art Museum), 955,000 (the Vancouver Art Gallery), 7,500 (the California Institute of Art) and 2,972,453 (the Centro de Arte y Comunicación). Titled after the populations of the cities in which the shows were held, each catalogue was an envelope of loose note cards containing statements, documentation and conceptual works by each artist, to be rearranged, filed or discarded at will. If Lippard described Conceptual art as the dematerialization of the art object, these catalogues effectively announced the dematerialization of the art exhibition. (One reviewer claimed Lippard had been the artist, and that her medium had been other artists.) 4,492,040 includes such iconic figures as Vito Acconci, Carl Andre, Siah Armajani, Terry Atkinson, John Baldessari, Michael Baldwin, Robert Barry, Rick Barthelme, Daniel Buren, Rosemarie Castoro, Hanne Darboven, Walter de Maria, Jan Dibbets, Christos Dikeakos, Eleanor Antin, Dan Graham, Hans Haacke, Eva Hesse, Douglas Huebler, On Kawara, Edward Kienholz Sol LeWitt, Roelof Louw, Duane Lundon, Bruce McLean, Robert Morris, N.E. Thing Co., Bruce Nauman, Adrian Piper, Allen Ruppersberg, Ed Ruscha, Richard Serra, Robert Smithson, Jeff Wall and Lawrence Weiner.

Unopened, new.

“When Attitudes Become Form: Bern 1969/Venice 2013”, a cura di Germano Celant in dialogo con Thomas Demand e Rem Koolhaas ricostruisce, in un inedito e sorprendente rifacimento, “Live in Your Head. When Attitudes Become Form”, una mostra ideata e realizzata da Harald Szeemann alla Kunsthalle di Berna nel 1969 e passata alla storia per il radicale approccio del curatore alla pratica espositiva, concepita come medium linguistico. Riproporre oggi in modo letterale una mostra del 1969, mantenendo le originarie relazioni e connessioni visuali e formali tra le opere, ha posto una serie di interrogativi sulla problematicità e sul significato stesso di un progetto che si è sviluppato attraverso una profonda discussione sotto diverse prospettive: artistica, architettonica e curatoriale. Si è deciso di innestare la mostra – nella sua totalità di muri, pavimenti e relative installazioni e oggetti d’arte – nella storica struttura architettonica e negli ambienti di Ca’ Corner della Regina, arrivando a inserire in scala 1:1 le stanze moderne della Kunsthalle, delimitate da superfici parietali bianche, negli antichi saloni affrescati del palazzo veneziano. Si tratta di fatto di un esercizio di doppia occupazione: così come la Kunsthalle fu occupata da una giovane generazione di artisti rivoluzionari nel 1969, con lo stesso spirito le sale riccamente decorate di Ca’ Corner della Regina sono a loro volta invase dalle stanze novecentesche della Kunsthalle. Il risultato è una sovrapposizione tanto letterale quanto radicale di spazi, che genera relazioni nuove e inaspettate tra le opere stesse e tra le opere e lo spazio. L’intento di questa operazione è ridare vita al processo espositivo con cui “When Attitudes Become Form” venne realizzata, così da evitare la mediazione dei documenti fotografici e filmici, e poterlo esperire e analizzare “dal vero”, esattamente com’era, seppur trasportato dall’ieri all’oggi. “When Attitudes Become Form: Bern 1969/Venice 2013” riunirà – dopo un’approfondita ricerca, compiuta a stretto contatto con gli artisti, i loro eredi e le loro fondazioni, e in collaborazione con Glenn Phillips, curatore del Getty Research Institute di Los Angeles (GRI) che ospita l’archivio e la biblioteca di Harald Szeemann – le opere originali e presenti a Berna, quelle ritrovate e provenienti da importanti collezioni private e musei internazionali, Tra gli artisti presentati alla mostra figuravano, per citarne alcuni, Carl Andre, Giovanni Anselmo, Richard Artschwager, Joseph Beuys, Alighiero Boetti, Hanne Darboven, Walter De Maria, Jan Dibbets, Michael Heizer, Eva Hesse, Jannis Kounellis, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, Mario Merz, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Ryman, Sarkis, Richard Serra, Keith Sonnier, Lawrence Weiner e Gilberto Zorio.

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