This book examines the innovative work of thirty-four-year-old Scottish artist Douglas Gordon. Gordon is perhaps best known for installations that feature classic films by directors such as Alfred Hitchcock, Otto Preminger, and Martin Scorsese. In each of these works the original film has been manipulatedóslowed down, mirrored by the use of split screen or dual projection, or had its soundtrack alteredóto emphasize the artist’s own signature themes, which include trust, guilt, madness, confession, deception, and doubling.

Produced in conjunction with a survey of Gordon’s work at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, the book features essays by MOCA assistant curator Michael Darling, exhibition curator Russell Ferguson, Scottish novelist Francis McKee, and Guggenheim Museum curator Nancy Spector. Darlingís essay places Gordon’s work in the context of the Romantic tradition. Ferguson’s essay looks at Gordon’s work to date. It focuses on the issue of trust as it weaves its way from early works such as the performance/installation Trust Me, through his tattoo and instruction works, to more recent works such as Feature Film, which incorporates the Hitchcock film Vertigo. McKee compiles Gordonís literary sources into a kind of hybridized text. Spector’s essay focuses on the autobiographical nature of Gordon’s oeuvre, showing how he shifts between revealing details of his personal lifeófor example, the ongoing List of Names lists all the people he has met in a given period of timeó-and obscuring other aspects of his identity. Designed by the studio of Bruce Mau in close collaboration with Gordon himself, this book promises to be the definitive reference on one of today’s most exciting young artists.

Douglas Gordon has proven himself a master of adaptation, bending the works of other artists through his own refractive lens. One of the most decorated artists of his time, he has stretched Hitchcock’s Psycho from two hours to twenty-four, he has set Taxi Driver‘s unsettling “You talking to me?” scene into a two-screen projection, and now, he’s taken his obsession with a novel by Scottish writer James Hogg (1770-1835) to new lengths. Gordon’s Confessions is an immersive environment based on The Memoirs and Private Confessions of a Justified Sinner, a narrative of shifting perspectives that traces a strict Calvinist young man’s descent into a series of murders. Gordon’s ingenious and disturbing work used the three levels of the Kunsthaus Bregenz, where it first appeared, to explore different sensory experiences of the story, from a printing room that produces the story’s pages on an industrial-age offset press to a black-light-shrouded space where the viewer only hears the story to an installation of large-format and silent film projections on the front and back of a diaphanous screen.

This catalogue, designed by Bruce Mau, echoes the format of the exhibition with three slipcased volumes that give the reader an experience comparable to that of the show.

The dark back alleys that crisscross the city are home to objects that, at first glance, seem to be discarded’the random detritus of the man-made world. Under the scrutiny of Michael Wolf’s photographic eye, these objects become fascinating installation pieces, while the abstract patterns of the buildings reveal the beauty and order that underlie the apparent chaos of the city. Thought-provoking texts by Kenneth Baker and Douglas Young explore the choices that people make of lifestyle, form, function, identity, and design, as well as the notion of Hong Kong as a brand.

For the latest Bloomberg Commission at the Whitechapel Gallery, Italian artist Giuseppe Penone continues his career-long reflection on the passing of time and the contact between man and nature. Spazio di Luce (Space of Light) is a bronze cast of the thick layer of wax surrounding a 12 metre-tall larch, with a radiant gold-leaf interior. The work spreads dramatically across the columned gallery and will be on display from September 2012 until August 2013. Born in 1947 in Garessio, Italy, Giuseppe Penone studied at the Accademia di Belle Arte before leaving formal education to pursue his artistic practice in the woods surrounding his home. Aged 22, he was the youngest member to be admitted to the legendary group Arte Povera, which called for a radical rethink of society through making works directly appealing to the senses and challenging common conventions of art making. Penone has exhibited widely in Europe and America and his work is held in important international collections including Tate Modern, London and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. His large-scale sculpture Idee di Pietra inaugurated dOCUMENTA 13 in 2010 and he was recently selected as 2013 artist for Versailles. He currently lives and works in Turin, Italy. This publication has been created in close collaboration with the artist and gives a unique insight into the universe of ideas that underpins his works. It brings together previously unpublished drawings, photographs of historic actions and recent sculptures, and a selection of the artist’s own writings. The publication also includes an interview between Achim Borchardt-Hume and the artist, an essay by art critic and scholar Douglas Fogle focusing on Penone’s work with trees alongside full page colour installation images of the exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery.

The chance situation or random eventówhether as a strategy or as a subject of investigationóhas been central to many artists’ practices across a multiplicity of forms, including expressionism, automatism, the readymade, collage, surrealist and conceptual photography, fluxus event scores, film, audio and video, performance, and participatory artworks. But whyóa century after Dada and Surrealism’s first systematic enquiriesódoes chance remain a key strategy in artists’ investigations into the contemporary world?

The writings in this anthology examine the gap between intention and outcome, showing it to be crucial to the meaning of chance in art. The book provides a new critical context for chance procedures in art since 1900 and aims to answer such questions as why artists deliberately set up such a gap in their practice; what new possibilities this suggests; and why the viewer finds the art so engaging.

Artists surveyed include: Vito Acconci, Bas Jan Ader, Francis Alys, William Anastasi, John Baldessari, Walead Beshty, Mark Boyle, George Brecht, Marcel Broodthaers, John Cage, Sophie Calle, Tacita Dean, Stan Douglas, Marcel Duchamp, Brian Eno, Fischli & Weiss, Ceal Floyer, Huang Yong Ping, Douglas Huebler, Allan Kaprow, Alison Knowles, Jiri Kovanda, Jorge Macchi, Christian Marclay, Cildo Meireles, Robert Morris, Bruce Nauman, Yoko Ono, Gabriel Orozco, Cornelia Parker, Robert Rauschenberg, Gerhard Richter, Daniel Spoerri, Wolfgang Tillmans, Keith Tyson, Jennifer West, Ceryth Wyn Evans, La Monte Young

Writers include: Paul Auster, Jacquelynn Baas, Georges Bataille, Daniel Birnbaum, Claire Bishop, Guy Brett, Benjamin H. D. Buchloh, Stanley Cavell, Lynne Cooke, Fei Dawei, Gilles Deleuze, Anna Dezeuze, Russell Ferguson, Branden W. Joseph, Siegfried Kracauer, Jacques Lacan, Susan Laxton, Sarat Maharaj, Midori Matsui, John Miller, Alexandra Munroe, Gabriel Perez Barreiro, Jasia Reichardt, Julia Robinson, Eric L. Santner, Sarah Valdez, Katharina Vossenkuhl

Documents of Contemporary Art series
Copublished with Whitechapel Gallery, London

The book Under Fire. 1 is one instantiation of the Under Fire project. It is an edited compilation of a series of dialogues that occurred online from 25 January through 19 April, 2004, between artists, political scientists, critics, activists and journalists both from the West and the Middle-East. The discussions were moderated by Jordan Crandall. Under Fire.2 is an edited compilation of a series of dialogues that occurred online from September through December, 2004. Contents: Preface and introduction by Jordan Crandall; With conributions by Akbar Ahmed, John Armitage, Asef Bayat, Ryan Bishop, Benjamin H. Bratton, Doug Brooks, Susan Buck-Morss, Hamid Dabashi, Manuel DeLanda, James Der Derian, Ian Robert Douglas, Cyrill Duneau, Joy Garnett, Gena Gbenga, Salwa Ghaly, Chris Hables Gray, Ryan Griffis, Brian Holmes, Alice Hunsberger, Thomas Keenan, Mary Keller, Bracha Lichtenberger-Ettinger, Saba Mahmood, Gema Martín Muñoz, Loretta Napoleoni, Nik, Amir Parsa, Bernard Roddy, Brigitte van der Sande, Harel Shapira, P.W. Singer, Ognjen Strpic, Ana Valdés, Eyal Weizman, David Young; Biographies; Select bibliography.

By the 1990s, public art had evolved far beyond the lonely monument on an open plaza. Now public artists might design the entire plaza, create an event to alter the social dynamics of an urban environment, or help to reconstruct a neighborhood. Dialogues in Public Art presents a rich blend of interviews with the people who create and experience public art–from an artist who mounted three bronze sculptures in the South Bronx to the bureaucrat who led the fight to have them removed; from an artist who describes his work as a “cancer” on architecture to a pair of architects who might agree with him; from an artist who formed a coalition to convert twenty-two derelict row houses into an art center/community revitalization project to a young woman who got her life back on track while living in one of the converted houses. The twenty interviews are divided into four parts: Controversies in Public Art, Experiments in Public Art as Architecture and Urban Planning, Dialogues on Dialogue-Based Public Art Projects, and Public Art for Public Health. Tom Finkelpearl’s introductory essay provides a concise overview of changing attitudes toward the city as the site of public art. This book includes interviews with Vito Acconci, John Ahearn, David Avalos, Denise Scott Brown, Rufus L. Chaney, Mel Chin, Douglas Crimp, Paulo Freire, Andrew Ginzel, Linnea Glatt, Louis Hock, Ron Jensen, Kristin Jones, Maya Lin, Rick Lowe, Jackie McLean, Frank Moore, Jagoda Przybylak, Assata Shakur, Michael Singer, Elizabeth Sisco, Arthur Symes, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Robert Venturi, and Krzysztof Wodiczko.

A photographic journey across London, taking in a selection of contemporary art and a curry along the way. Based in London, nvisible Museum is the product of twelve years’ worth of acquisitions by a collector who prefers to remain anonymous. Works are often seminal pieces by young artists early in their careers. Uniquely, the contents of collection are dispersed and nomadic, lent to friends and artists in the collection, and from time to time loaned to art institutions in thematic exhibitions, including the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco; Migros Museum, Zurich; Kiasma Museo, Helsinki; and Sir John Soane’s Museum, London in 2002. <I>Invisible London</I> is a photographic journey from Heathrow to Brick Lane, taking in some of the city’s public places and moving inside the flats, houses and studios where the collection of nvisible Museum is locatedin subtle and compelling opposition to the gigantism and monumentalism of contemporary art collecting. Combines art and voyeurism with glimpses of an extraordinary art collection. 90 color photographs. Artists represented: Nobuyoshi Araki; Matthew Barney; Richard Billingham; Kate Blacker; Louise Bourgeois; Jake and Dinos Chapman; Tacita Dean; Tracey Emin; Katharina Fritsch; Paul Graham; Douglas Gordon; Richard Hamilton; Tim Head; Damien Hirst; Gary Hume; Callum Innes; Emma Kay; Simon Linke; Adam Lowe; Steve McQueen; Paul Miller aka DJ Spooky; Tatsuo Miyajima; Paul Morrison; Cady Noland; Gabriel Orozco; Simon Patterson; Mark Pimlott; Marc Quinn; Liisa Roberts; Tim Rollins + K.O.S.; Gregor Schneider; Simon Starling; Georgina Starr; Thomas Struth; Sam Taylor-Wood; Mark Wallinger; Rachel Whiteread; Gerard Williams; Yves Klein.

In 1965, the Walker Art Center presented the work of 13 young British artists in the exhibition London: The New Scene. In recent years, international art magazines have been attempting to come to grips with the explosion of work from the British art scene. The Walker is the first major museum to mount a sweeping review of this provocative work with “Brilliant!” New Art from London, organized by Chief Curator Richard Flood. Heralded by The Independent on Sunday as the highlight of the 1995 art season, the exhibition features 22 young artists internationally acknowledged as among the most exciting working today. “Brilliant!” New Art from London will be on view October 22, 1995-January 7, 1996. The artists chosen for the exhibition have become increasingly visible over the past six years in self-promoted, renegade exhibitions and publications that have cropped up throughout London. Their aesthetically diverse and provocative artworks are united by a shared interest in ephemeral materials, unconventional presentation, and an anti-authoritarian stance that lends their objects a youthful, aggressive vitality. Ranging in age from 22 to 35, most of the artists are graduates of a handful of London art schools (notably Goldsmiths’ College and the Slade School of Fine Art), which have provided a fertile ground for the development of emerging artists in the late 1980s and early 1990s. At the end of the 1980s, faced with a flattened art market and a sense that the aesthetic options open to them were extremely limited, these artists adopted an entrepreneurial attitude of collective self-promotion evident in such exhibitions as Freeze (1988), organized by then-Goldsmiths’ student Damien Hirst and held in a rundown warehouse on the Surrey Docks of East London. A seminal event in this history, Freeze demonstrated the independence, self-reliance, and intense professionalism of these young students. “Brilliant!” New Art from London will be comprised of approximately 100 works of widely diverse and hybrid media, including painting, drawing, sculpture, installation, video, photography, and CD-ROM by Henry Bond, Glenn Brown, Dinos Chapman, Jake Chapman, Adam Chodzko, Mat Collishaw, Tracey Emin, Angus Fairhurst, Anya Gallaccio, Liam Gillick, Damien Hirst, Gary Hume, Michael Landy, Abigail Lane, Sarah Lucas, Chris Ofili, Steven Pippin, Alessandro Raho, Georgina Starr, Sam Taylor-Wood, Gillian Wearing, and Rachel Whiteread. Rachel Whiteread and Damien Hirst both share a relationship to Minimalism, but twist it back toward the social. Whiteread has come to prominence for her castings of the negative space of rooms, bathtubs, beds, and even a house. Her Untitled (Room) (1993), a cast of the interior of a room, recently earned her the much coveted Turner Prize. Also on view will be Hirst’s The Acquired Inability to Escape, Inverted (1993), a large vitrine with an office desk, chair, and ashtray suspended from its ceiling. Providing a commentary on class structures in England, the business world is here invoked as a site of surveillance, exclusion, and suffocating conformity. Photography and video also play a central role in “Brilliant!” New Art from London. On view will be the photographic series Documents (1991-1994) by Henry Bond and Liam Gillick, a collaborative photo-text installation archived in a filing cabinet with a card catalog to be used by the public in a library-like situation.

Published in conjunction with an exhibit that will travel from San Francisco to Houston, New York, and Chicago through January 2004, this volume features the photographic work of the beloved author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Many of Lewis Carroll’s photographs are of young girls he knew, often posed in costume with elaborate scenery and props that convey a sense of fantasy similar to that portrayed in his fiction. Curator of photography at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Nickel focuses on the subject matter of Carroll’s photographs and how it relates to the Victorian preoccupation with symbolism in art. He also discusses some previous interpretations of Carroll’s work, including speculations about Carroll’s personal relationships with the girls in his pictures.

Contents: Europe in Soho – Paula COOPER, , ARMAN, Marcel, DUCHAMP, GILBERT & GEORGE, Pier Paolo CALZOLARI, Mario MERZ, Giulio PAOLINI, Alighiero BOETTI, Piero MANZONI, Hans HAACKE, Jannis KOUNELLIS, Giovanni ANSELMO, Ulrich RUCKRIEM, SALVO, Joseph BEUYS, Jan DIBBETS, Hanne DARBOVEN, Laura GRISI, Gerhard RICHTER, Daniel BUREN, Christian BOLTANSKI, Jean LE GAC, Roman OPALKA, Richard LONG, Arthur KOPCKE, Hanne DARBOVEN, Ben VAUTRIER, Rebecca HORN, Robert FILLIOU Fluxus in New York – LA MONTE YOUNG, Gorge MACIUNAS, Takehisa KOSUGI, Benjamin PATTERSON, George BRECHT, Robert WATTS, Takako SAITO, Al HANSEN, Larry MILLERS, NAM JUNE PAIK Street Works Downtown – Scott BURTON, Stephen VARBLE, Adrian PIPER, Richard HAYMAN, Donna HENES, Rosemarie CASTORO, Daniel BUREN, Joan JONAS, Trisha BROWN, Mary MISS, Gordon MATTA-CLARK, Richard SERRA, Vito ACCONCI, Yayoi KUSAMA SOHO DU MAL. Film, Video, Culture, Politics – Dennis OPPENHEIM, Dan GRAHAM, Roger CUTFORTH, Peter CAMPUS, Michael SNOW, Douglas DAVIS, Shigeko KUBOTA, Joseph BEUYS, NAM JUNE PAIK, John CAGE, Jaime DAVIDOVICH, Mary LUCIER, Liza BEAR Music, Tanz, Performance – Mabou MINES, Richard FOREMAN, Merce CUNNINGHAM, GRAND UNION, David TUDOR, John CAGE, Robert ASHLEY, Gordon MUMMA, Alvin LUCIER, Jim BURTON, David BEHRMAN, Steve REICH, Philip GLASS, Meredith MONK, Viola FARBER, Lucinda CHILDS, Joan LA BARBARA, Robert WATTS, Simone FORTI, Charlemagne PALESTINE, Giuseppe CHIARI, Laurie ANDERSON,

Band 1: malerei, plastik, performance.- Band 2: fotografie film video.- Band 3: handzeichnungen, utopisches design, bücher.- Artsts: Berenice Abbott, Hermann Albert, Carl Andre, Ben d’Armagnac, Christian Ludwig Attersee, Vito Acconci, Pierre Alechinsky, Theo Angelopoulos, Arman (Armand Fernandez), Bernhard Aubertin, Valerio Adami, Gerhard Altenbourg, Ottomar Anschütz, Fernando Arrabal, Joannis Avramidis, Robert Adamson, Robert Altman, Horst Antes, Eduardo Arroyo, Alice Aycock, Peter Ackermann, Anatol, Ant Farm, Art & Language, Billy Adler, Gisela Andersch, Shusaku Arakawa, David Askevold, Chantal Akerman, Laurie Anderson, Diane Arbus, Eugène Atget, Francis Bacon, Monika Baumgartl, Joseph Beuys, Fernando Botero, Kevin Brownlow & Andrew Mollo, Michael Badura, Hippolyte Bayard, Michael von Biel, Margaret Bourke-White, Günter Brus, Eduard Denis Baldús, Thomas Bayrle, Werner Bischof, Mathew B. Brady, Anatol Brosilowsky, Balthus, Cecil Beaton, Louis-Auguste Bisson & Auguste-Rosalie Bisson, Brassaï (Gyula Halász), Wojciech Bruszewski, Joachim Bandau, Bernd e Hilla Becher, Irma Blanck, George Brecht, Luis Buñuel, Jared Bark, Stephan Beck, Karl Blossfeldt, KP Brehmer, Chris Burden, Robert Barry, Bill Beckley, Bernhard Blume, George Hendrik Breitner, Daniel Buren, Jennifer Bartlett, John Ernest Joseph Bellocq, Mel Bochner, Heinz Breloh, Scott Burton, Gianfranco Baruchello, Carmelo Bene, Peter Bogdanovich, Robert Bresson, Michael Buthe, Giorgio Batistella, Franz Bernhard, Claus Böhmler, Stuart Brisley, James Lee Byars, Gerd Baukhage, Jean-Marie Bertholin, Blythe Bohnen, Jürgen Brodwolf, Horst H. Baumann, Nuccio Bertone, Karl Bohrmann, Marcel Broodthaers, Bodo Baumgarten, Jean-Louis Bertucelli, Christian Boltanski, Stanley Brouwn, Enzo Cacciola, Robert Capa, Barbara Chase-Riboud, Pinchas Cohen-Gan, Michael Craig-Martin, Julia Margaret Cameron, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Eduardo Chillida, James Collins, Fritz Cremer, Colin Campell, Étienne Carjat, Christo, Miguel Condé, José Luis Cuevas, Peter Campus, Ugo Carrega, Chryssa, Tony Conrad, Edward Curtis, Louis Cane, Lewis Carroll, Chuck Close, Steven Cortright, Veassis Caniaris, Claude Chabrol, Harold Cohen, Claudio Costa, Miodrag Djuric (Dado), Douglas Davis, Walter De Maria, Jim Dine, Juan Downey, Louis Daguerre, Ger Dekkers, Agnes Denes, Henry + Bool Alfred + John Dixon, Peter Downsborough, Hanne Darboven, Willem de Kooning, Fred Deux, Dore O., Michael Druks, Alan Davie, Philip Henry Delamotte, Jan Dibbets, Ugo Dossi, Marcel Duchamp, John Davies, Jack Delano, Braco Dimitrijevic, Christian Dotremont, David Douglas Duncan, Don Eddy, Paul Eliasberg, Heinz Emigholz, Ulrich Erben, Walker Evans, Benni Efrat, Ger van Elk, Ed Emshwiller, Hugo Erfurth, Valie Export, Sergej Eisenstein, Peter Henry Emerson, Leo Erb, Garth Evans, Öyvind Fahlström, Federico Fellini, Dan Flavin, Charles Frazier, Lee Friedlander, Herbert Falken, Roger Fenton, Richard Fleischer, Hermine Freed, Hamish Fulton, Ralston Farina, Armand Fernandez, Lucio Fontana, Will Frenken, Heidi Fasnacht, Vincenzo Ferrari, Fred Forest, Achim Freyer, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Robert Filliou, Terry Fox, Gisèle Freund, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Wolfgang Gäfgen, Jochen Gerz, Tina Girouard, Dan Graham, Nancy Graves, Abel Gance, Paul-Armand Gette, Michael Gitlin, Eve Gramatzki, Alan Green, Alexander Gardner, Peter Gidal, Wilhelm von Gloeden, Tom J. Gramse, Marty Greenbaum, Winfred Gaul, Wolfram Giersbach, Jean-Luc Godard, Gotthard Graubner, Alberto Grifi, Rupprecht Geiger, Gilbert & George, Hubertus Gojowczyk, Nancy Graves, Robert Grosvenor, Michael Geissler, Frank Gilette, Kuno Gonschior, Walter Grasskamp, Hetum Gruber, Arnold Genthe, Raimund Girke, Camille Graeser, Gotthard Graubner, Renato Guttuso, Roel D’Haese, Haus-Rucker-Co, Wilhelm Hein, Lewis Hine, Nan Hoover, Helfried Hagenberg, Erich Hauser, Bernhard Heisig, Leon Hirszman, Rebecca Horn, David Hall, Lady Hawarden, Michael Heizer, Antonius Höckelmann, Horst P. Horst, Nigel Hall, Ron Hays, Al Held, David Hockney, George Hoyningen-Huene, Phillipe Halsman, Tim Head, Werner Herzog, Anatol Herzfeld, Alfred Hofkunst, Richard Hamilton, Erwin Heerich, Eva Hesse, Rudolf Hoflehner, Douglas Huebler, Heijo Hangen, Axel Heibel, David Octavius Hill, Edgar Hofschen, Danièle Huillet, Noriyuki Haraguchi, Birgit Hein, John Hilliard, Hans Hollein, Alfonso Hüppi, Karl Horst Hödicke, Shohei Imamura, Will Insley, Jean Ipoustéguy, Patrick Ireland, Hans Paul Isenrath, Ken Jacobs, Paul Jaray, Jasper Johns, Francis Benjamin Johnston, Miklós Jancsó, Jo Jastram, J. Douglas Johnson, Donald Judd, Horst Janssen, Alejandro Jodorowsky, Joan Jonas, Martha Jungwirth, Wolf Kahlen, Buster Keaton, Jürgen Klauke, Beril Korot, Ferdinand Kriwet, Max Kaminski, Ellsworth Kelly, Alexander Kluge, Joseph Kosuth, Germaine Krull, Howard Kanovitz, Michael Kenny, Werner Knaupp, Jannis Kounellis, Shigeko Kubota, Tadeusz Kantor, André Kertész, Günther Knipp, Andras Kovács, Stanley Kubrick, Allan Kaprow, Anselm Kiefer, Milan Knížák, Attila Kovács, Gary Kuehn, Dani Karavan, Harry Kipper, Imi Knoebel, Kurt Kren, Marin Karmitz, Alain Kirili, Alice Kochs, Dieter Krieg, Gertrude Kasebier, Ronald B. Kitaj, Christof Kohlhöfer, Richard Kriesche, On Kawara, Konrad Klapheck, Jiří Kolář, Les Krims, Willem de Kooning, László Lakner, Barry Le Va, Michael Leisgen, Lawrence Lobe, Urs Lüthi, Arthur Lamothe, Russell Lee, Les Levine, Francisco Lopez, Georg Platt Lynes, Richard Landry, Jean Le Gac, Sol LeWitt, Antonio Lopez-Garcia, Nikolaus Lang, Gustave Le Gray, Roy Lichtenstein, Joseph Losey, Dorothea Lange, Malcolm Le Grice, Richard Lindner, Bernhard Luginbühl, John Latham, Barbara Leisgen, Michael Lingner, Bernhard Lüthi, Heinz Mack, Kenneth Martin, Gerhard Merz, Alexander Mitta, Robert Morris, Nino Malfatti, Charles Marville, Mario Merz, Milan Mölzer, Alfons Maria Mucha, Felix H. Man (Hans Baumann), Roberto Matta, Borg Mesch, Bernard Moninot, Ugo Mulas, Robert Mangold, Gordon Matta-Clark, Anette Messager, Henry Moore, Antoni Muntadas, Andy Mann, Wolfgang Mattheuer, Adolphe de Meyer, Stefan Moore, Walter Murch, Werner Mantz, Cynthia Lee Maughan, Duane Michals, Carmengloria Morales, J.-J. Murphy, Piero Manzoni, Antony McCall, Henri Michaux, Marcello Morandini, Zoran Mušič, Giacomo Manzù, Barry McCallion, Rune Mields, Pit Morell, Eadweard Muybridge, Robert Mapplethorpe, Bruce McLean, Antoni Miralda, François Morellet, Brice Marden, Syd Mead, Josef Mikl, Maria Moreno, Agnes Martin, Dariush Mehrjui, Joan Miró, Malcolm Morley, Tomitaro Nachi, Bruce Nauman, Wolfgang Nestler, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce, Maria Nordman, Félix Nadar, Charles Nègre, Richard Newton, Ansgar Nierhoff, Gabriele & Helmut Nothhelfer, Maurizio Nannucci, Werner Nekes, Max Neuhaus, Richard Nonas, Lev V. Nussberg, Dore O., Timothy O’Sullivan, Roman Opalka, Nagisa Oshima, Oswald Oberhuber, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, Jean Otth, Brian O’Doherty, Claudio Olivieri, Anna Oppermann, Hilmar Pabel, Giulio Paolini, A. R. Penck, Pablo Picasso, Lucio Pozzi, Nam June Paik, Eduardo Paolozzi, Peng-Wan-Ts, Otto Piene, Heinz-Günter Prager, Blinky Palermo, Gordon Parks, Beverly Pepper, Walter Pichler, Mario Prassinos, Magnus Palsson, Sergei Paradschanow, Elio Petri, Anne & Patrick Poirier, Panamarenko, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Wolfgang Petrick, Sigmar Polke, Gina Pane, Max Peintner, Friederike Pezold, Don Potts, Isabel Quintanilla, Daniel Quintero, William Raban, John Reilly, Jacob August Riis, Peter Roehr, Ed Ruscha, David Rabinowitch, James Reineking, Bridget Riley, Ulrike Rosenbach, Ken Russell, Arnulf Rainer, Albert Renger-Patzsch, Klaus Rinke, James Rosenquist, Claude Rutault, Yvonne Rainer, Jean Renoir, Larry Rivers, Francesco Rosi, Reiner Ruthenbeck, Robert Rauschenberg, Alain Resnais, Jacques Rivette, Roberto Rossellini, Robert Ryman, Man Ray, Erich Reusch, Józef Robakowski, Dieter Roth, Éric Rohmer, Tony Ray-Jones, Hans Peter Reuter, Dorothea Rockburne, Arthur Rothstein, Martial Raysse, George Warren Rickey, Alexander Rodtschenko, Gerhard Rühm, Reindeer Werk, Hans Salentin, Tomas Schmit, Eugen Schönebeck, Michael Singer, Edward Steichen, Sohrab Shadid Saless, Wolfgang Schmitz, Martin Schwarz (Künstler), Willi Sitte, Saul Steinberg, Erich Salomon, Helmut Schober, Martin Scorsese, Neal Slavin, Frank Stella, Lucas Samaras, Eugen Schönebeck, George Segal, David Smith, Alfred Stieglitz, Fred Sandback, Ben Schonzeit, Antonio Seguí, Robert Smithson, Sir Benjamin Stone, August Sander, Rudolf Schoofs, Friedrich Seidenstücker, Fernando Ezequiel Solanas, Paul Strand, Sarkis Zabunyan, Jan Schoonhoven, Richard Serra, Michael Snow, Jean-Marie Straub, Antonio Saura, Werner Schroeter, Ben Shahn, Alan Sonfist, Liselotte Strelow, Konrad Balder Schäuffelen, Heinz Schubert, Joel Shapiro, Eve Sonneman, Michell Stuart, Georgij Schengalaja, Alf Schuler, Charles Sheeler, Keith Sonnier, Josef Sudek, Alexander Schleber, HA Schult, Stephen Shore, Daniel Spoerri, István Szábo, Barbara Schmidt-Heins, Bernard Schultze, Katharina Sieverding, Klaus Staeck, Gabriele Schmidt-Heins, Emil Schumacher, Charles Simonds, Ted Stamm, Jiro Takamatsu, Andrej Tarkowskij, George Trakas, Peter Tuma, Vassilakis Takis, André Thomkins, François Truffaut, Deborah Turbeville, William Henry Fox Talbot, Jean Tinguely, Costas Tsoclis, Richard Tuttle, Antoni Tàpies, Gérard Titus-Carmel, Werner Tübke, Cy Twombly,Günther Uecker, Lee U Fan, Timm Ulrichs, Ursula Schultze-Bluhm, Giuliano Vangi, Wladimir Veličkovič, Bill Viola, Klaus Vogelsang, Hannsjörg Voth, Agnès Varda, Bernard Venet, Luchino Visconti, Wolf Vostell, Andrzej Wajda, Weegee, Orson Welles, Gottfried Wiegand, Claus Peter Wittig, Willie Walker, William Wegman, Wim Wenders, Klaus Wildenhahn, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Franz Erhard Walther, Peter Weibel, Lina Wertmüller, Dorothee von Windheim, Erwin Wortelkamp, Andy Warhol, Lawrence Weiner, Dsiga Wertow, Gerd Winner, Fritz Wotruba, Ryszard Wasko, Roger Welch, Marthe Wéry, Reindert Wepko van de Wint, Klaus Wyborny, Wolfgang Weber, Peter Weller, Tom Wesselmann, Rainer Wittenborn, Keigo Yamamoto, Yves Yerson, Yoshio Yoshida, Frank Young, Herbert Zangs, Gianfranco Zappettini, Jerry Zeniuk, Heinrich Zille, Krzysztof Zanussi, Michele Zaza, Christian Ziewer, Zush

×